October 17 – Daily Notes – Amanda

context

Context is key in Scripture. This is why it’s so important to read the whole Bible and not just pick out words and phrases that we like or agree with. In 1 Timothy, Paul addresses women, but it’s important to know that there was a significant group of women in the church he’s addressing who were teaching bad doctrine.

Jeremiah 30:1-31:26:

  • 1-11 – God promises to restore Israel and Judah but also makes it clear that they will still be punished for their sins. He assures them that it will be a lighter punishment.
  • 3 – God’s faithfulness to Israel had nothing to do with their ability to reciprocate but simply because of his great love for them. Humanity can never fully reciprocate God’s love for us.
  • 10-14 – What beautiful, comforting promises! God promises to turn mourning into joy, give comfort, and turn sorrow into gladness.

1 Timothy 2:1-15:

  • 1-4 – We should be in prayer for all people to come to salvation.
  • 5-7 – Paul assures his readers of his calling. His words assuring them he’s not lying about his calling are comically conversational.
  • 8-11 – Remember that Paul was addressing problems occurring in the church. Here, he was teaching women, who presumably had entered worship with flashy, distracting clothes and jewelry, to dress modestly. He also addresses the men that have become quarrelsome over theological debates.
  • 12-15 – This passage, particularly verse 12, can be problematic, particularly in our context where we affirm women in pastoral leadership. Are we practicing the faith unfaithfully or is the Bible wrong? Neither of these have to be true for us to resolve this issue. The main question we need to ask is whether or not we believe this passage was meant for its particular context. In the United Methodist church we have concluded that it was for the particular context Paul was addressing.

Psalm 87:1-7:

  • 4 – This verse lists off several surrounding areas of Jerusalem (Zion). Jerusalem, and what would ultimately happen there (Jesus’ death and resurrection), were intended to be a blessing to all people. The writers of this psalm could not have known exactly how yet, but they believed that it would be true.

Proverbs 25:18-19:

  • 19 – When needed, these things will all ultimately fail you.

April 28 – Daily Notes – Amanda

dr seuss

Dr. Seuss is often credited with the quotation, “Those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.” Though not the same words, Proverbs had a similar sentiment long before Seuss. Today’s Proverb reminds us not to give any merit to those who scoff at our attempts to be faithful.

Judges 8:18-9:21:

  • 22-23 – God had purposefully not given the Israelites a ruler or king. God was their king. Gideon and the other judges were intended to act as guides, but not rulers.
  • 29 – Remember, Jerubbaal was Gideon’s other name.
  • 6 – Clearly Abimelech wasn’t intended to be king, but the people wanted one and appointed him king anyway.

Luke 23:44-24:12:

  • 46 – The temple curtain was designed to separate the holiness of God from the sin of the people. Jesus’ death both symbolically and literally removed this barrier.
  • 50-51 – The council had approved Jesus’ death, but Joseph of Arimathea dissented.
  • 1-11 – It is significant that it was women who first witnessed Jesus’ resurrection because the testimony of women did not count.
  • 12 – Once again, it is Peter who is first to seek out Christ.

Psalm 99:1-9:

  • 6 – Moses, Aaron, and Samuel were all Jewish heroes of the faith. The fact that they worshipped and were avenged by God gave even more clout to God.

Proverbs 14:9-10:

  • Foolish people mock us when we choose to do what is right and choose to obey God and repent. We should give their mocks no merit.

What to Expect – Week 11

donkey

Do you ever long for something you used to complain about? Like naps as little kids, now we would die for one in the middle of a long afternoon! In this week’s Numbers readings, the Israelites continue to long for what they begged to get out of. Their wanderings in the desert prove difficult and they think they’d rather be back in Egypt. You’ll also hear a talking donkey, learn the purpose of the Levites, and much more!

This week we also start a new gospel! Luke begins his gospel by explaining that he will provide an orderly, organized account of Jesus’ life and ministry. You’ll recognize his birth narrative from every Christmas Eve service you’ve ever been to. But you may never have noticed that there’s something different from the birth narrative in Matthew. Matthew focuses more on Joseph’s perspective while Luke focuses more on Mary’s.

Some other cool fun facts about Luke:

  • Luke also wrote Acts, which we’ll read after John.
  • Luke is known for its wide array of Jesus’ parables. Parables are found in Matthew, Mark, and Luke, but Luke has the most.
  • In Luke, women play a larger role than in any other gospel.
  • Luke contains both Mary’s Magnificat and Zechariah’s song – both beautiful praise pieces.

Enjoy this week! We’re making great progress! This is the 9th book we’ve started, so we’re doing great!!

Jan. 1 – Matthew 1:1-2:12 – Andrew

Matthew 1:1-2:12

1:2-1:17 – The genealogies seem boring to modern readers, but they are important because they show that biblical faith is grounded in history.  The Jews believed that God had actually worked through their ancestors, and the genealogies are a way of indicating that.  Also, there are 4 women mentioned in the genealogy, and all the references are scandalous….  What does that say about Jesus?

Love this version of Matthew’s Begats by Andrew Peterson:

–AF