October 22 – Daily Notes – Amanda

promise

The destruction and terror Jeremiah has been preaching for so long is now impending. This would be terrifying! But God promised to protect Jeremiah and those who had been good to him. So does he? Yes! Of course! Even when things look terrifying, we can trust that God will stay true to his promises. If he’s promised protection, he’ll protect us. If he’s promised healing, we’ll receive healing. We can trust that his promises are true. We see it over and over in Scripture.

Jeremiah 39:1-41:18:

  • 1-10 – The impending destruction of Jerusalem has finally come. The Babylonians, as prophesied, overtake the Israelites.
  • 11-18 – Amidst the destruction, God still takes care of Jeremiah and has King Nebuchadnezzar protect him. God also promises to protect Ebed-melech, the Ethiopian who rescued Jeremiah from the cistern.
  • 1-6 – Jeremiah is given the option of where he wants to be. He chooses to stay in Judah.
  • 1-10 – Ishmael, a member of the royal house of Judah, kills Gedaliah, the governor Babylon had placed over all that remained in Judah. This was a very dangerous act by Ishmael.

2 Timothy 1:1-18:

  • 1-2 – Timothy was a protégé of Paul’s.
  • 6-7 – Faith can be taught to us, like it was to Timothy, but we still have to claim it for ourselves, as Paul is encouraging Timothy to do.
  • 8-14 – Paul teaches Timothy to cherish the faith and testimony he’s been given and to be willing to suffer for it.

Psalm 90:1-91:16:

  • 12-17 – Having already established the power of God, the psalmist asks God to provide for and sustain him and to bless the work that he does.
  • 1-16 – The psalmist encourages others that God will protect them. Even when it looks hopeless and when others around them are being killed, God is in control.

Proverbs 26:1-2:

  • 2 – If a curse is cast but has no cause, it will not come to fruition.

What to Expect – Week 42

follow-the-leader

Can you believe it? We only have 10 weeks left of our One Year Bible readings!! We are so close!

This week, we shift gears from our letters from Paul to various churches to letters from Paul to an individual. Paul ministered to a lot of people, but one of his biggest investments was in a young man named Timothy. Timothy was a protégé of Paul’s and was often used as a stand in for Paul. If Paul couldn’t make the trip, Timothy was sent.

But how does that happen? Where does it start?

Paul used the discipleship model he spelled out in 1 Corinthians, “follow my example as I follow the example of Christ.” He let Timothy watch him do ministry and included him on anything and everything he could. Timothy learned by watching.

Who is your Timothy?

October 10 – Daily Notes – Amanda

pray for them

It’s hard for most of us to understand persecution for our faith. The worst we normally have to face is someone ridiculing us for our beliefs. In today’s 1 Thessalonians reading, Paul praises the Thessalonians for enduring persecution for the gospel. As you read it, take a second to pray for those around the world who daily face persecution for the gospel.

Jeremiah 14:11-16:15:

  • 13-22 – There were many false prophets who were opposing what God was saying through Jeremiah and they were leading the Israelites astray. God tells Jeremiah what to say in response to the false prophets.
  • 1-9 – God is not backing down in coming after the false prophets and everyone who follows them.
  • 10-21 – Jeremiah is afraid of the people and God confirms his commitment to and protection of Jeremiah. God’s response in verses 19-21 are very powerful.
  • 1-15 – The first 13 verses are very bad news for the Israelites. They will face a great deal of destruction. The last two verses give hope, though, that they will eventually be returned to God’s intent for them.

1 Thessalonians 2:10-3:13:

  • 13-16 – The Thessalonian believers clearly faced a great deal of persecution as they initially pursued Christ. Paul, multiple times, expresses gratitude for their faithfulness in the midst of it.
  • 17-5 – Paul explains why he hasn’t visited Thessalonica again, but why Timothy visited instead.

Psalm 80:1-19:

  • 1-13 – Asaph, the psalmist, asks God why he would bother bringing the Israelites out of Egypt only to forsake them later.
  • 14-19 – Asaph asks that God returns to the people and restores them.

Proverbs 25:1-5:

  • 2-3 – God’s mind is far greater than that of a king, but a king’s mind is greater than that of a common person.
  • 4-5 – Kings, in order to be faithful and successful, should be taken away from bad advisors and influences.

October 1 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Isaiah's calling

As we wrap up Isaiah, it is incredible to think back on the month or so it has taken us to get through this powerful book. Isaiah rejects and then accepts his call, preaches destruction and exile for the Israelites, preaches eventual restoration for the Israelites, and sprinkles little hints of what to look for in a Messiah throughout. And while it is, at times, a difficult book to trudge through, A) you did it! and B) it offers both immediate and eternal hope.

Isaiah 62:6-65:25:

  • 6-12 – God continues to paint the picture of Jerusalem’s coming salvation. He speaks of preparations for that day and makes promises that the Israelites will no longer be defeated.
  • 1-6 – God speaks of how he took vengeance on his enemies.
  • 7-19 – The speaker changes to someone who is remembering how merciful God has been and then asking for more of that mercy.
  • 1-12 – They continue to ask to see God’s power in saving them and bringing them out of trouble.
  • 1-16 – God juxtaposes the treatment of his servants with that of those who choose not to serve him. God’s servants will receive great blessing while the others will receive great pain.

Philippians 2:19-3:4a:

  • 19-24 – Timothy was a young man Paul had taken under his wing. Paul commissioned him to spread the gospel as well.
  • 2-4 – Once again Paul explains that living by the Spirit is far more necessary than circumcision. He reminds his readers that he, as a Jew, is circumcised so he can say this out of truth and not jealousy.

Psalm 73:1-28

  • The entire psalm, but with a crescendo in verses 25-26, are attesting to the confidence the psalmist has in God as his hope, salvation, and protection.

Proverbs 24:13-14:

  • This portion makes a very tangible comparison of how wisdom benefits us.

June 24 – Daily Notes – Amanda

yoda

In today’s Acts reading we meet Timothy, Paul’s protégé. Paul mentors and trains Timothy to also be able to minister to early churches and spread the gospel. Paul prepares Timothy for pitfalls, allows him to watch his ministry and travel with him, and encourages him in his gifts. What if we each had a faith protégé?

2 Kings 6:1-7:20:

  • Here’s that chart of the kings again, just in case:  kings of Judah and Israel
  • 1-7 – This was not just a party trick or Elisha showing off. The man’s accident with the axe head was done while attempting to be more faithful. Elisha used God’s power to bless his faith.
  • 15-19 – Elisha’s servant is given special sight to see what’s going on. The Syrian army is not struck completely blind, but just blind to Elisha’s true identity.
  • 20-23 – Though a rare occasion in the Old Testament, the Syrians and Israelites are able to resolve the situation peacefully.
  • 25 – People are buying donkey heads and dove poop. Clearly the famine was really bad. They were so desperate they were eating the least desirable part of an unclean animal and paying high dollar for dove poop – which they were probably burning or using for other household tasks – not eating it.
  • 26-31 – While this story is absolutely horrifying – here is some background: Joram was the king of Israel. His sins as well as the sins of the people had gotten so out of control that some of the curses associated with breaking their covenant with God had started to occur. Though Joram’s response in verse 31 suggests that the famine and reactions by the people are God or Elisha’s fault, it was actually caused by the ongoing sin of the people.
  • 3-20 – The four lepers were Israelites, this is why they tell the king when the Syrians’ camp is empty. The Israelites, like Elisha prophesied, had abundant, affordable food.

Acts 15:36-16:15:

  • 39-40 – Church disputes happen because we’re human. Like this one, God works good through our failures. Now there are two teams ministering instead of the one they had before.
  • 1-5 – Timothy became Paul’s protégé. Paul circumcised Timothy, even though it was no longer truly necessary, to give him credibility with those he would minister to.
  • 10 – Note that the narrator goes from being simply a narrator to a participant by starting to use “we”. This is to indicate that Luke, the writer of Acts, has joined the mission team.

Psalm 142:1-7:

  • This psalm said it was written when David is in the cave. This is most likely talking about when he was hiding in the cave with some of his men and Saul came in to use the restroom. David had an opportunity to kill Saul, but only cut off a piece of his robe instead.
  • At this time David has been anointed as king but is on the run because Saul is still in power and is pursuing him to kill him.

Proverbs 17:24-25:

  • 24 – We often look to everything else to satisfy us, but wisdom will guide us faithfully where we are supposed to go.