November 1 – Daily Notes – Amanda

guardrail

Do you remember learning, in elementary school, that it takes more muscles to frown than to smile? It is kind of surprising that we have to make special effort to frown. This is kind of like when we think about what Hebrews tells us today – it is easier to stray from God’s path than to remain faithful. Shouldn’t it be easier to remain faithful? Unfortunately, there are a lot of outside forces pulling us away from faithfulness. This is why we need to surround ourselves with other faithful folks to help bounce us back on the righteous path.

Ezekiel 1:1-3:15:

  • 1-3 – This gives the context of Ezekiel’s visions from God, which he is now prophesying.
  • 4-28 – This sets the scene of what Ezekiel sees as he receives his visions. The creatures, wheels, and dome, all play a part in showing God’s majesty as he speaks to Ezekiel.
  • 2 – Ezekiel, more than any other prophet, makes the Spirit an emphasis.
  • 2:8-3:3 – Ezekiel is twice instructed to eat a scroll. This is, in effect, asking him to fill himself with the word of God.
  • 12-15 – God’s wind takes Ezekiel from the sweetness of ingesting God’s scrolls back to the stark contrast of the harsh reality of the exiles. Ezekiel becomes bitter.

Hebrews 3:1-19:

  • 1-6 – Moses, like David and Elijah, was highly revered for his acts of faithfulness by Jewish people. The author, here, is explaining that as great Moses was, Jesus is higher.
  • 12-15 – It is harder to live faithfully than it is to fall away because temptation and complacency are constantly pulling us away from faithfulness. This encourages us to help each other stay faithful.
  • 16-19 – The author encourages the believers to learn from the Israelites wandering in the desert’s mistakes.

Psalm 104:1-23:

  • This psalm offers a series of the many ways God provides for his creation. Each is so thoughtful and intricate.

Proverbs 26:24-26:

  • 24-26 – Hate in our heart can be masked by kind sounding words, but will eventually shine through.

October 21 – Daily Notes – Amanda

raining dollar bills

We often don’t like it when people talk about money in church. We often think they want our money or they’re going to tell us to give away our money. Too often, we hold onto our money so tightly that we can’t grab hold of anything else. But, money is not the root of the problem. The problem comes when we allow money to become more important to us than God. Today’s 1 Timothy reading touches on righteous living versus greed and the place in our lives that money should occupy.

Jeremiah 37:1-38:28:

  • 11-21 – King Zedekiah didn’t like what Jeremiah said about being taken over so he imprisoned him.
  • 1-6 – The officials wanted to kill Jeremiah so they put him in a cistern. This is normally a deep hole, which is used to hold water. This one was empty.
  • 7-13 – Ebed-melech, who was a servant, rescued Jeremiah from the cistern so he wouldn’t starve to death in there.
  • 14-28 – King Zedekiah asks Jeremiah to tell him the truth. Jeremiah tells Zedekiah he has to surrender to the Babylonians or all his wives and kids will be given over to the Babylonians for them to do what they like.

1 Timothy 6:1-21:

  • 6-8 – Godliness and contentment together are a powerful combo. We don’t want anything but what we’ve been given and we act as righteously as possible.
  • 9-10 – Greed and covetousness are dangerous because we begin to do things we know are wrong to achieve what we want.
  • 17-19 – Being rich isn’t the problem. The problem comes when we rely on and hope in our riches.

Psalm 89:38-52:

  • 38-45 – The portion of this psalm we read yesterday speaks of how God was planning to exalt David. This portion is explaining that David’s family has now been forgotten and rejected. We know through Isaiah and Jeremiah that David’s line was given over to exile in Babylon because of their lack of obedience.

Proverbs 25:28:

  • Self-control is what protects us from temptation and sin, just like walls protect a city from attack.

September 26 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Embezzlement

In Paul’s writings, including today’s excerpt from Ephesians, he often writes lists of sins to avoid. It’s important that we recognize that these lists are not exhaustive. Paul is writing to specific people groups who are struggling with specific sins so those are the sins he calls out. Like today, if you were talking to a group of teenagers you would talk about doing drugs, gossip, and premarital sex as sins. You probably wouldn’t mention embezzlement. Embezzlement is a sin, but not one those kids are struggling with at the time.

Isaiah 48:12-50:11:

  • 12-22 – God explains to the Israelites how much they could have prospered if they had just followed him.
  • 1-6 – This is from the perspective of the servant who also spoke in chapter 42. This servant was called by God to speak to Israel.
  • 14-26 – God promises Israel that he will restore them and that they will soon come out of exile.

Ephesians 4:17-32:

  • 17-20 – This is referring to Gentiles who have not been saved. The majority of Paul’s ministry was to Gentiles, so he obviously didn’t write them all off as heathens.
  • 25-31 – Paul urges the Ephesians to avoid temptation and sin. This is not an exhaustive list, but most likely one that spoke to common temptations the Ephesians were facing.

Psalm 69:1-18:

  • 1-6 – David does not deny that he has sinned but still cries out for help because of his enemies who have no cause for hating him.
  • 7-18 – David is being judged and tormented for his commitment to God but he knows that his hope is in the Lord.

Proverbs 24:5-6:

  • Wisdom and knowledge are more than just nice things to have. They benefit us in a variety of practical ways. War was a big deal to the culture the proverbs were originally written for.

September 25 – Daily Notes – Amanda

refinery

What have been the most formative times of your life? For me and for many I know, formation, and especially transformation, often comes during times of trial. Though God does not send us trials for this purpose, he does use the trials to bring about his purposes. In Isaiah, God explains that the Israelites have been refined through the significant trial of exile.

Isaiah 45:11-48:11:

  • 11-25 – The Lord establishes that he is God and there are no other gods above or beside him.
  • 1-13 – God points out the ridiculousness of worshipping something you’ve created yourself. He lists off a few reasons that these gods clearly have no power. Humans created them. They can’t even control themselves.
  • 1-15 – God chastises the Babylonians for mistreating the Israelites when they were in captivity and explains that they will be punished.
  • 1-11 – The Lord explains that he was refining the Israelites through their trials. This is often a painful process but is necessary for our growth and faithfulness.

Ephesians 4:1-16:

  • 1-7 – Paul urges the Ephesians to be of one mind and heart. He reminds them that they were all saved by the same means and should use this as a bond.
  • 11-16 – God had equipped the Ephesian believers through a variety of helpers so they could mature in their faith and not be swayed so easily by false prophets or temptations.

Psalm 68:19-35:

  • 27 – Saul, the first king of Israel, was from the tribe of Benjamin, which would put that tribe in the lead.
  • The psalmist calls on God to protect and prosper the Israelites and rounds everything out with praise for God’s abilities.

September 22 – Daily Notes – Amanda

potato-salad

This is not my recipe, but I get compliments every time I make it. You should try it. It’s great for barbecues, potlucks, and the like. I’d suggest the addition of a little bit of salt. You see, when we find things that are good, whether it’s a movie, recipe, or thought, we tend to share it. This is what the psalmist is calling us to do today. When God does something great in your life, tell others. Make it known so they might experience Him too.

Isaiah 39:1-41:16:

  • 1-8 – Hezekiah started out faithful, but like several other kings, made some poor choices in his later years. He shows off his wealth to his Babylonian visitor. It seems that the sin in this is trying to befriend Babylon in an effort to have an ally against Assyria. God wants Judah to seek him as their only ally.
  • 1-31 – God offers comfort to his people and assurance that he will care for them. There are several beautiful passages within the chapter that can speak comfort to us today.
  • 3 – This verse is quoted regarding John the Baptist who was called to prepare the way for Christ.
  • 8-10 – God continues to comfort the Israelites of Judah assuring them that he will hold them up and keep them safe.

Ephesians 1:1-23:

  • 3-10 – Paul praises God for allowing he and his fellow believers to know God and his grace. He thanks God for his plan of salvation.
  • 15-23 – This is Paul’s prayer for the church that the Ephesians would understand God’s great works and the gifts he had given them.

Psalm 66:1-20:

  • 5-7 – We see another reference to God’s great act of parting the Red Sea. The psalmist, who has great faith, knows that God’s acts are incredible and invites other simply to come and see what the Lord has done.
  • 16-17 – Not only does the psalmist want the reader to see God’s good works, the psalmist also wants to tell personally of the great things God has done.

Proverbs 23:25-28:

  • Here the proverb tries to warn of the temptations and consequences of lust.

September 4 – Daily Notes – Amanda

flashcards

Do you have any Scripture memorized? If not, and even if you have some, I’d encourage you to do your best to memorize Scripture. Today’s Proverb indirectly encourages it. There are probably songs you can start singing at the drop of a hat, or movie lines you can quote…that’s because you have them memorized and they’re on the tip of your tongue. When we treat Scripture like this, we are blessed through the comfort, hope, and joy Scripture brings and we can be a blessing by sharing it with others.

Ecclesiastes 7:1-9:18:

  • 1-14 – Though not the most exciting message, this aims our sites at death because, ultimately, that’s where we’re all headed. The section also lets us know that joy is always accompanied by sorrow. God made both and we can’t really have one without the other.
  • 19-22 – These verses make it clear that righteousness in humanity is very relative.
  • 27-29 – In biblical poetry, women tend to be personified as either tempting seductresses or virginal and pure. This is most likely what’s going on here as Solomon explains the temptation of folly in the face of wisdom.
  • 1-7 – Solomon continually retorts that what we achieve on earth is somewhat insignificant because we all die. But be sure to read through to the end to learn his final conclusion.

2 Corinthians 7:8-16:

  • 9 – Paul is ok with the Corinthians feeling a little bit of pain because it led to the ultimate good of repentance.
  • 13-16 – Though much of the content of Paul’s letters was rebuke and instruction, he delighted when new believers acted in Christ-like ways. This is why both he and Titus rejoiced.

Psalm 48:1-14:

  • 1-8 – The psalmist calls on people to give God praise because of the great protection God had offered them in past situations.
  • 9-14 – The reflections of who God is and what he has done cause the people to share of his goodness for generations to come.

Proverbs 22:17-19:

  • When we have words of wisdom on our lips, they are the ones that come out of our mouths first. This is the same reason we want to have Scripture memorized.

August 15 – Daily Notes – Amanda

are you afraid

There was a show on Nickelodeon called “Are You Afraid of the Dark?” in the 90s. I couldn’t watch it then and I feel quite certain I probably can’t watch it now. I hate scary things. But our psalm today reminds us how to conquer fear – seek the Lord. Elsewhere in Scripture it says, “perfect love drives out all fear” and frequently when messengers of the Lord show up they’re first words are “fear not”. So, what are you so afraid of?

Nehemiah 9:22-10:39:

  • 22-31 – The Israelites conquer several nations and have large growth in their population. Both of these fulfill God’s promises to their ancestors.
  • 32-33 – This third of a shekel was in addition to the taxes already put in place by former rulers. This was above and beyond.

1 Corinthians 9:19-10:13:

  • 19-23 – Paul found ways to relate to all people so he could better present the gospel to them. This should not be misunderstood that he took on other people’s sins to relate to them.
  • 24-27 – If athletes are willing to put their body through intense training to win a race, particularly when only one person wins the race, isn’t it worth it for Paul to discipline himself in order to share the gospel?
  • 13 – This is the verse often misquoted and misunderstood as saying, “God won’t give you anything you can’t handle.” Read it again. That’s not what it says. This is regarding temptation and it simply says he will give you a way out of the temptation when you face it.

Psalm 34:1-10:

  • 4 – Clear instructions on how to handle fear. Seek the Lord.
  • 8-10 – We can see and experience God’s provision in so many ways.

Proverbs 21:13:

  • This sounds similar to the gospel story regarding Lazarus and the rich man in Luke 16:19-31.

August 13 – Daily Notes – Amanda

distraction

Today’s reading in Nehemiah reminds us how easy it is to get distracted from God’s purposes and plans for us. These days, we have far more avenues for distraction than the post-exilic Israelites. What do you do to keep yourself focused on God’s purposes for your life?

Nehemiah 5:14-7:60:

  • 1-14 – It is easy to get distracted from the work God has set out for us to do, but Nehemiah was faithful in refusing to be distracted from finishing the restoration of Jerusalem’s wall.
  • 6-60 – This is a listing of the people who returned to Israel from exile in Babylon.

1 Corinthians 8:1-13:

  • Much of Paul’s instruction in this first letter to the Corinthians regards caring for those who aren’t as far along in their faith development. Though our faith may be strong enough to withstand certain temptations, others’ may not be. We are called to cater to their needs in those situations.

Psalm 33:1-11:

  • We are to offer our praises to God because he is able to do great things and he does great things.

August 11 – Daily Notes – Amanda

bad behavior

There are a number of passages, like the one in today’s 1 Corinthians reading, which have been misinterpreted as condoning practices we don’t generally think God would condone. Here it is marrying a non-believer. In other areas of Scripture it’s divorce or owning slaves. These passages should not be read as God condoning the behavior, rather as guidelines for people who are already engaging in these practices. I.e. If you’ve already married a non-believer, don’t divorce them. Instead, act like this for a chance to bless them.

Nehemiah 1:1-3:14:

  • Nehemiah was originally combined with Ezra as one book.
  • 3 – The walls of Jerusalem were broken down from when the temple was destroyed and the Israelites were taken into exile.
  • 8-11 – Nehemiah reminds God of his promise that he would always allow people to return to him even if they had strayed. This is a good reminder for many of us.
  • 11 – The cupbearer was a very important position. This person made sure the king’s drink was not poisoned or tampered with in any way. This person had to be very trustworthy. In Genesis, Joseph makes friends with the kings cupbearer who is imprisoned because the king thought he was trying to harm him.
  • 1-8 – These were big asks. Even being sad in a king’s presence could get you in major trouble, but then also asking to be gone and for him to write special letters for you. The king, here, is being kinder than he had to be, but it says that’s because the hand of the Lord was on Nehemiah.

1 Corinthians 7:1-24:

  • 1-5 – This may seem like an odd section of Scripture, but it is encouraging us to have regular sex with our spouses. Withholding sex can lead to all kinds of sins and temptations for both partners.
  • 12-16 – This is not encouragement to marry an unbeliever, but instruction that if you are already married to an unbeliever to stick with them because you could be the conduit through which they come to faith.

Psalm 31:19-24:

  • 22-24 – Here David makes an interesting point. He explains that in a panicked situation he assumed God was not with him, but recognized that God did, in fact, hear his cries. With this he encourages others to wait on the Lord.

Proverbs 21:4:

  • We always have reason to be humble because we are not God.

July 6 – Daily Notes – Amanda

donut

There are silly things we are tempted by like donuts and paying too much for a pair of jeans we don’t need. But today’s psalm deals with more serious temptations and, unfortunately, they’re ones we face just as often. These temptations entice us to trust them more than we trust God. These are things like, our own strength, money, success, etc. Though they’re sometimes hard to recognize, what tempts you to trust it in stead of God?

1 Chronicles 2:18-4:4:

  • 18-20 – Though this just feels like a big list of names, it’s interesting to see names you recognize from stories. Bezalel, for instance, was one of the skilled workers who helped create the tabernacle.
  • 1-9 – Yes, David had a lot of sons and a lot of wives. Notice that Solomon, who became the next king after David is way down on the list of sons.

Acts 24:1-27:

  • 22-27 – It seems as if Felix might come to faith based on Paul’s teachings, but it doesn’t seem that he does. Instead he leaves Paul in prison, which means he has now been in prison for 2 years.

Psalm 4:1-8:

  • 5-8 – These verses hit hard the idea that we are tempted to trust in many other things but our true rest and comfort come only from God.

Proverbs 18:16-18:

  • 17 – This verse backs up the adage that there are always two sides to every story. Withhold judgment of decisions until you have heard from both parties.