August 27 – Daily Notes – Amanda

fulfillment

One of the great benefits of reading the Bible in its entirety is seeing the prophecies and expectations over centuries fulfilled in Christ’s coming. In today’s 2 Corinthians reading, Paul maps out a number of these fulfillments. What prophecy that Jesus fulfills is most powerful to you?

Job 23:1-27:23:

  • 2-7 – Job believes if he could get an audience with God, God would agree that he had been far too righteous to receive such a harsh and heavy hand.
  • 1-25 – Job explains that often, throughout life, the poor have difficulties and the wicked reap the benefit. He seems to explain that God doesn’t seem to be watching, but in the end he explains that everyone is brought low in the end.
  • 1-6 – Bildad quickly retorts that God is simply greater than humans and cannot be compared.
  • 1-6 – Here Job resolves not to turn his back on God, but to remain faithful.
  • 7-23 – Here Job lays out how he hopes his enemies are treated in the end.

2 Corinthians 1:12-2:11:

  • 20 – All the sacrifices, laws, and prophecies given for thousands of years were fulfilled in Christ. We know that everything God promises us becomes a “yes” through Christ and his offer of salvation.
  • 1-4 – Paul’s intentions did not go over well with the Corinthian church. His visit seems to have caused them pain when he meant for it to show them his love for them.
  • 5-11 – Paul urges the group to forgive those who sin against the group. Amongst believers, this is very important so the devil doesn’t have an easy way in.

Psalm 41:1-13:

  • 1-3 – Here David explains how God will repay those who have cared for the poor in life.
  • 4-13 – This is encouragement not to listen to what others say of you, but to believe what God says about you.

Proverbs 22:5-6:

  • 6 – It is difficult to guide and discipline a child. In our society, it is even harder to assure they are raised in the faith. As difficult as it is in the moment, it is the easiest way to assure they will be faithful for a lifetime.

June 26 – Daily Notes – Amanda

good king bad king

Have you noticed yet, in 1 & 2 Kings, what the biggest factor in a king being a good or bad one is? In general, if they follow and worship God, they’re a good king. If they do not, they’re a bad king. Do you think that translates into our culture in any way?

2 Kings 9:14-10:31:

  • 14-22 – Joram was king of Israel. Jehu wanted to be. Ahaziah was the short-lived king of Judah. Jehu confirms that he’s not coming in peace because peace is impossible while Joram still allows his mother, Jezebel’s evil ways to remain in the land.
  • 25-26 – King Ahab wanted to buy Naboth’s plot of land, but Naboth wouldn’t sell. Jezebel told Ahab to have Naboth killed, so he did.
  • 29 – This is the same Ahaziah that just died. There was also a king of Israel named Ahaziah, but he’s already come and gone.
  • 1-8 – Naturally, one of Ahab’s sons should have become king after Ahaziah’s death, but Jehu assures that doesn’t happen by killing them all.
  • 18-31 – Jehu seems to have such potential to be faithful to God by wiping out Baal from Israel, but he remains sinful in other ways.

Acts 17:1-34:

  • 1- Thessalonica is where Paul sent the Letter to the Thessalonians. He did not visit all the churches he wrote to, but this is one he did.
  • 2-9 – Jason was a local believer who allowed Paul and Silas to stay with him. He was punished with a fine for hosting the apostles.
  • 11-12 – People weren’t simply believing blindly, but were studying the Scriptures to discern and it led them to the truth.
  • 22-34 – Paul’s address to the people of Athens is powerful and convincing, even quoting some of their culture’s writings. As was always the case, some were convinced and some were not.

Psalm 144:1-15:

  • 1-2 – War was a way of life for David. While some he talks about are internal, he often is talking about real wars.
  • It is clear, due to the frequency with which David addresses God in these ways, that he views God as his provider and protector.

Proverbs 17:27-28:

  • 28 – This is the origin of the well-known adage, “Better to remain silent and thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt.”

June 18 – Daily Notes – Amanda

This link is in the notes as well, but seriously, if you’d like Amy Grant to tell you today’s main Acts story, do yourself a favor and watch this video:

1 Kings 19:1-21:

  • 8 – Moses, Jesus, and now Elijah have all experienced 40 day fasts. Notice that each of them have just experienced or are simultaneously experiencing the power and glory of God. Jesus had just been baptized and received the Holy Spirit, Moses was on the mountain with God, and Elijah had just seen God consume a bull with fire.
  • 11-12 – Often we miss God’s voice and what he’s calling us to do because we’re distracted by the chaos and the big shows. At times, we must be quiet and still to hear him in the whisper.
  • 14-18 – Elijah felt very alone in his faithfulness to God and even feared for his life. God made it clear that he was not alone, but that God would take care of those who had been faithful while punishing those who had not.
  • 19 – Elijah putting his cloak on Elisha symbolizes a transfer of power.
  • 20-21 – Elijah’s response is unclear, but Elisha takes care of a few final things and then begins his life working with and learning from Elijah.

Acts 12:1-23:

  • 3 – Passover was also when Jesus was arrested and killed.
  • 6-11 – A thrilling, 80’s, musical rendition of this story: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNIO9KH3UC8.
  • 12-17 – They assumed that Peter would die in prison and were not expecting to see him.

Psalm 136:1-26:

  • We are to love God because of his great love for us. All the things he does for us, because of his love, are icing on the cake.

Proverbs 17:14-15:

  • 15 – Condoning evil and persecuting good are both equally detestable to God.

April 9 – Daily Notes – Amanda

chicken or egg

Like the argument of the chicken and the egg, one of the biggest points of conflict between Jesus and the Pharisees was whether Sabbath laws trumped human need or vice versa. Today, in our Luke section, Jesus heals on the Sabbath. He clearly chooses human need over Sabbath Law.

Deuteronomy 33:1-29:

  • Moses offers blessings to each of Israel’s tribes based on the role they tended to play. Some were larger, some had great warriors, some were set aside for teaching God’s law to the rest of the people.
  • 29 – He rounds out his blessing with a reminder of how adeptly God cares for them and that they are truly set apart.

Luke 13:1-21:

  • 10-17 – The synagogue’s authorities yet again become enraged by Jesus’ actions because he “does work” by healing on the Sabbath. Jesus reminds them that they do too do work on the Sabbath, but have found a way to justify it, while he does work on the Sabbath to bless and love people.
  • 18-19 – There are many interpretations of why the mustard seed is a good comparison for the Kingdom of God. Some say that it’s because a mustard seed is tiny and grows quickly into something great. Others say it is because a mustard seed grows in a wild, uncontrollable fashion. Others say it is because the birds make nests in the mustard tree just like we can make a home and be welcomed into the kingdom of God.
  • 20-21 – Leaven activates ingredients do to what they’re supposed to do. Leaven also makes dough rise.

Psalm 78:65-72:

  • There are several times in Scripture where it describes God as silent. Before he calls Samuel and when there were no prophets for 400 years before John the Baptist arrived are some examples.
  • 68 – Judah was the tribe that both David and Jesus came from.

Proverbs 12:25:

  • Anxiety is normally equated with worry. The Bible often equates worry with a lack of trust. God continually gives us reason to trust as he continually proves himself faithful.