November 30 – Daily Notes – Amanda

apocalypse

Don’t be surprised if you don’t recognize the remainder of Daniel. Today’s reading marks a major shift in the content of Daniel. The second half of the book focuses on apocalyptic literature. It is the only Old Testament book with a significant emphasis on the apocalypse.

Daniel 7:1-28:

  • This chapter shifts the book from the stories we learned as kids to the apocalyptic portion of Daniel.
  • 1-8 – Foreign powers are no longer depicted favorably in Daniel.
  • 9 – The Ancient of Days is God.
  • 19-27 – The fourth beast represents Antiochus. Antiochus rises to power overtaking the faithful folks for a time, but ultimately, God prevails.

1 John 1:1-10:

  • 1-4 – Here John confirms that God was made flesh in the person of Jesus. And John wants to share that message with everyone, which will make his joy complete.
  • 5-7 – We can’t call ourselves faithful and continue to blatantly walk in sin. There’s also a rockin DC Talk song about this.

Psalm 119:153-176:

  • 157-158 – The psalmist doesn’t allow others to turn him away from his commitment to God’s law.
  • It’s pretty incredible that this is by far the longest psalm and it is almost exclusively about the psalmist’s love and commitment for God’s word.

Proverbs 28:23-24:

  • 23 – This contrasts a true friend versus someone who just offers lip service. One is helpful. The other is not.

November 27 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Because one time isn’t enough to hear this song, enjoy the musical version of a portion of today’s psalm:

Daniel 4:1-37:

  • 1-3 – Remember, Nebuchadnezzar turned his allegiance to God after witnessing the miracle of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego not burning up in the fire.
  • 4-27 – The king calls on Daniel to interpret his dream and it’s not favorable. Daniel must have been understandably scared to deliver the bad news to the king.
  • 28-37 – Nebuchadnezzar still takes credit for the power of Babylon, which destroyed Israel and captured their people. God humbles him and reminds him who is truly in control.

2 Peter 1:1-21:

  • 3-4 – God gives us insight into faithful living and what he wants from us for our own good and so we can follow him.
  • 19-21 – This confirms that prophecies were given by God through the Holy Spirit. At this point, many prophecies had come true, but this was encouragement to continue to trust those that hadn’t.

Psalm 119:97-112:

  • 97-104 – The psalmist continues to show great love for God’s commands. He realizes that this is where he can receive wisdom and protection.
  • 105 – A familiar and beautiful verse proclaiming the great help Scripture can give us.

Proverbs 28:17-18:

  • 17 – Guilt of this kind of sin cannot be taken away.

November 24 – Daily Notes – Amanda

not my fault

We all hate admitting when we’re wrong. People might think we’re dumb or think we’re often wrong if they don’t have a good sample size. We want to seem competent and with it and we like to prove why we’re better than others. Today’s proverb reminds us, though, that the humility of admitting fault can free us and others in so many ways.

Ezekiel 47:1-48:35:

  • 1-12 – Clearly this imagery is meant to be a metaphor for something else. Leading Ezekiel through the water of increasing depths may represent God leading us through deeper and deeper depths of trust. The good fruit growing out of the temple’s waters could represent God providing good things for the people.
  • 13-23 – The land had to be re-divided between the Israelite tribes now that Israel is back from exile.
  • 10 – The temple, though the original one was destroyed, was still designed to be the center of the Israelites’ existence.
  • 35 – The Lord is There is one of the many names God is given throughout Scripture to describe something he has done for his people.

1 Peter 2:11-3:7:

  • 11-12 – We know God doesn’t want us to fall to temptation and sin, but we rarely think of how negatively it affects us and we often fail to see the benefits of living faithfully.
  • 18-25 – It seems ludicrous and completely unjust for us to endure punishment or suffering for something we’re not guilty of, but that’s what Christ did and sometimes we are called to endure as well. (These types of verses have also been used to justify things like domestic abuse. That is not what is intended by this passage.)
  • 1-2 – Our kindness and goodness can often draw others to Christ.
  • 3-6 – Outward beauty is fleeting, but inward beauty will always be beneficial.

Psalm 119:49-64:

  • 54-56 – This speaks of a time when God’s word was a comfort when the psalmist was out of his element. God’s word can do the same for us.

Proverbs 28:12-13:

  • 13 – It is so hard to admit where we are wrong, but it brings freedom for us and others.

November 18 – Daily Notes – Amanda

too far away

Don’t miss today’s reading! There is a ton of great stuff in here! It’s even hard to decide what to entice you with here, but I’ll go with this: if you think you’re beyond restoration or repair, read today’s Ezekiel passage. God raises dry bones back to life! No one is beyond forgiveness! No one can stray so far that God can’t redeem them! That means you too!!

Ezekiel 37:1-38:23:

  • 1-14 – Ezekiel’s prophecies over the dry bones give hope that God can restore Israel even though their situation seems hopeless and their nation seems lifeless.
  • 15-23 – God promises to reunite Israel and Judah and to, once again, be their God.
  • 14-23 – Though Gog had seen success against Israel, God makes it clear that Israel will rise again and it will not bode well for Gog.

James 1:19-2:17:

  • 22-25 – Reading Scripture alone is not enough. We must also live what it tells us to do. Otherwise we are like a foolish person.
  • 27 – If we truly want to follow God we must care for the most vulnerable in his name.
  • 1-9 – We tend to want to associate with those who are powerful and can lift us up, but God does the opposite. He lifts up the lowly. God is calling us to share in his work.
  • 10-13 – We tend to want to make our sins seems less egregious, but once we have sinned, we are sinners.
  • 14-17 – This can be confusing because we know that faith in Christ is what saves us. We can’t save ourselves through works. This does not mean we’re not supposed to do the works though. Our salvation is intended to make us more like Christ, how worked diligently to care for those in need and bring others into God’s family.

Psalm 117:1-2:

  • Why do we praise the Lord? Because he loves us.

Proverbs 28:1:

  • When we’re entrapped in sin, we constantly have to watch our backs and wait for the other shoe to drop. When we are living faithfully, there is freedom from this fear.

November 13 – Daily Notes – Amanda

wedding

Proverbs has a lot of relationship advice – from friendship to marriages to parenting. Today’s tip on marriage is to pay attention to the signs someone gives you BEFORE you marry them! A wise man does not marry a woman who has proven herself hateful and quarrelsome. It just doesn’t make sense.

Ezekiel 27:1-28:26:

  • 1-36 – Tyre was a wealthy city because it was located on a port. But their wealth was where they placed their pride, which ultimately led to destruction. This section is a lament over the rise and fall of Tyre.
  • 1-10 – This is a prophecy against the prince of Tyre because he has placed himself above God. This is always going to be a bad idea.
  • 11-19 – The King of Tyre had at one time been in God’s good graces, but had since turned to unfaithfulness and had become a laughing stock.
  • 20-23 – The city of Sidon was also unfaithful and set to be destroyed. Tyre and Sidon, in the New Testament are often used as examples of what not to be, similar to Sodom and Gomorrah.
  • 24-26 – God promises to bring Israel back together after Israel and return to it.

Hebrews 11:17-31:

  • 26 – This verse should stop us in our tracks! Because of their deep and abiding faith that God’s promises are true, all these people acted faithfully with the willingness to wait for their rewards. Are we willing to do the same?

Psalm 111:1-10:

  • 1-3 – Let’s give thanks to the Lord for his great Word that we get to read in order to connect with him! Let’s do it even when it’s hard to find time to read!

Proverbs 27:15-16:

  • 15-16 – This is simply encouraging men to make wise choices about the women they choose. A combative nature would most likely be evident before marriage.

November 2 – Daily Notes – Amanda

accountability

Accountability is a big theme in today’s reading. Ezekiel is given a message from God and was held accountable for sharing it with the Israelites – as in, he would be held responsible for those who didn’t repent if he didn’t tell them too. Our reading in Hebrews also explains that once we know the gospel, we will be held accountable regarding whether we follow it or not. So what are you accountable for?

Ezekiel 3:16-6:14:

  • 16-18 – God puts a lot of pressure on Ezekiel here. He either gives the people God’s message or their destruction will be, at least partially, on his hands.
  • 27 – It was still on the people to make the decision whether or not to be faithful, but it was on Ezekiel to share the message of righteousness and repentance.
  • 1-17 – Ezekiel was to take on the punishment of Judah. They would see, through him, the ruin that was to come for them.
  • 10 – Yes, this sounds weird, but was a practice of some of the other pagan groups. God is basically telling his people they’re on their own for now and he knows that they will take on the practices of other people groups.

Hebrews 4:1-16:

  • 1-10 – We have a greater advantage towards faithfulness than those following Moses and Joshua did. Yet it is still possible for us to hear the good news and still fall short of all God intended for us. Many people hear the good news and still turn away from it.
  • 12-13 – Scripture is wonderful because it gives us opportunities to know God more, but once we know it, we are held accountable for what it teaches us.
  • 14-16 – Jesus faced the same things we face and came out of it without sin. We are not being asked to do anything he has not already done.

Psalm 104:24-35:

  • 24-30 – This is a continuation of how God powerfully and intricately cares for creation.

Proverbs 26:27:

  • If we create opportunities to harm others, it will ultimately come back on us.

June 26 – Daily Notes – Amanda

good king bad king

Have you noticed yet, in 1 & 2 Kings, what the biggest factor in a king being a good or bad one is? In general, if they follow and worship God, they’re a good king. If they do not, they’re a bad king. Do you think that translates into our culture in any way?

2 Kings 9:14-10:31:

  • 14-22 – Joram was king of Israel. Jehu wanted to be. Ahaziah was the short-lived king of Judah. Jehu confirms that he’s not coming in peace because peace is impossible while Joram still allows his mother, Jezebel’s evil ways to remain in the land.
  • 25-26 – King Ahab wanted to buy Naboth’s plot of land, but Naboth wouldn’t sell. Jezebel told Ahab to have Naboth killed, so he did.
  • 29 – This is the same Ahaziah that just died. There was also a king of Israel named Ahaziah, but he’s already come and gone.
  • 1-8 – Naturally, one of Ahab’s sons should have become king after Ahaziah’s death, but Jehu assures that doesn’t happen by killing them all.
  • 18-31 – Jehu seems to have such potential to be faithful to God by wiping out Baal from Israel, but he remains sinful in other ways.

Acts 17:1-34:

  • 1- Thessalonica is where Paul sent the Letter to the Thessalonians. He did not visit all the churches he wrote to, but this is one he did.
  • 2-9 – Jason was a local believer who allowed Paul and Silas to stay with him. He was punished with a fine for hosting the apostles.
  • 11-12 – People weren’t simply believing blindly, but were studying the Scriptures to discern and it led them to the truth.
  • 22-34 – Paul’s address to the people of Athens is powerful and convincing, even quoting some of their culture’s writings. As was always the case, some were convinced and some were not.

Psalm 144:1-15:

  • 1-2 – War was a way of life for David. While some he talks about are internal, he often is talking about real wars.
  • It is clear, due to the frequency with which David addresses God in these ways, that he views God as his provider and protector.

Proverbs 17:27-28:

  • 28 – This is the origin of the well-known adage, “Better to remain silent and thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt.”

June 1 – Daily Notes – Amanda

old bible

Today is the last day of the marathon psalm, Psalm 119! But isn’t it a great one!?! It becomes so obvious the deep and abiding love the psalmist has for Scripture. It is a lamp to his feet and a light to his path. Throughout the psalm, the writer makes it clear that he believes the law of God’s word is perfect and can guide us to live in a righteous manner. What would it look like if our love of Scripture was this deep?

2 Samuel 18:1-19:10:

  • 33 – David is deeply grieved at the loss of his son. Just like with Saul, he is able to forgive Absalom for wanting to kill him.
  • 1-8 – Joab is angry with David and explains to him that it won’t sit well with his followers that he is more saddened by Absalom’s death than happy for their hard work in victory.

John 20:1-31:

  • 4 – Like at Jesus’ trial, this disciple other than Peter is unnamed, but present.
  • 6-7 – An interesting note on Jesus’ burial cloths being left behind in the tomb is that when Lazarus was raised from the dead, he came out of the tomb still wrapped in burial cloths. Whether significant or not, it’s an interesting contrast.
  • 14 – No one who encounters Jesus after his resurrection recognizes him immediately.
  • 24-29 – We, like Thomas, often need proof in order to have faith. Jesus reminds Thomas that those who believe without seeing are blessed.
  • 30-31 – It’s powerful to think that the gospels were written so people like you and me would believe in Jesus.

Psalm 119:153-176:

  • Psalm 119 is, by far, the longest psalm in Scripture. Over and over again, in a variety of ways, the psalmist explains his deep love and commitment to Scripture. This truly must have been a great, devoted love.

March 26 – Daily Notes – Amanda

teaching

In today’s Deuteronomy reading we find the passage our children’s ministry is based on: Deuteronomy 6:4-9. It encourages us to be so immersed in the Bible that it is natural to teach it to our children as we spend time with them daily. I’d say reading the Bible every day for a year is a pretty great way to start the immersion.

Deuteronomy 5:1-6:25:

  • Moses reminds the Israelites of the 10 Commandments the Lord gave them. This is a bit of an extended version of the commandments.
  • 4-9 – This is the passage our children’s ministry uses as a guide. It encourages parents to pass down to the faith to their children and encourages families to keep God’s Word at the forefront.
  • 10-15 – We often take pride in the things we have even when we did not earn or work for them. This often leads to relying on entities other than God.
  • 16 – Jesus quotes this when he is tempted by the devil in the desert.
  • 25 – When we put our faith into action, it is counted to us as righteousness.

Luke 7:11-35:

  • 11-17 – This woman would have been in bad shape. Widows relied on male relatives to take care of them after their husbands died and this was her only son who had just died.
  • 18-19 – John believed that Jesus was the Messiah but needed confirmation.
  • 22-23 – Jesus quotes the same part of Isaiah that he did in the synagogue in chapter 4. But he leaves one significant line out: that the prisoners would be set free. John was in prison at the time and would most likely understand that Jesus was saying he would not be released, but that Jesus was the Messiah.
  • 26-27 – Jesus confirms that John was the messenger the prophets foretold and he is the Messiah for whom the messenger was to prepare the way.