December 18 – Daily Notes – Amanda

bieber where

From our finite point of view, we often have the question, like Habakkuk, “God, where are you?!?” When we or someone we love faces suffering or loss, we wonder where God is and why we’re not feeling his mercy. It’s difficult, at times, to understand. But like we learned in Job, God is always active. We may not see it or feel it, but he is in control and, as we’re learning in Revelation, God ultimately wins.

Habakkuk 1:1-3:19:

  • 1- No background is given regarding who Habakkuk is or what the purpose of the book is.
  • 1-17 – Habakkuk asks God a question many of us have asked or would like to ask: God, where are you when all these things are going wrong? Habakkuk asks God why he allows his people to suffer.
  • 6-20 – God responds with a series of promises of destruction and devastation for those who have harmed others, particularly his people, and disobeyed him. He assures Habakkuk that he will not remain silent.
  • 1-19 – Habakkuk’s last chapter is a prayer/psalm to God. Notice the word “selah” throughout it and how it ends with instructions on how it should be sung. Habakkuk recalls the work he’s seen God do as well as what he’s heard of God’s work. He ends with confidence that God will fulfill what he’s said he will do.

Revelation 9:1-21:

  • 1-6 – Well, this sounds pretty awful. Like during the first Passover, it was important to have the sign of God in order to avoid punishment. All those who God has not sealed got the locusts.
  • 20-21 – It’s important to remember that people are given chance after chance to repent and turn towards God, but they continually choose not to.

Psalm 137:1-9:

  • 1-9 – This psalm expresses the emotions of someone carried off to Babylon. This was clearly a devastating event.

Proverbs 30:10:

  • 10 – Though an explanation is not given, this verse seems to suggest simply to stay out of other peoples’ affairs.

November 25 – Daily Notes – Amanda

circumstances

Are you more or less likely to live faithfully when in difficult situations? If we’re honest, most of us are less likely to live faithfully. We tend to grasp at anything that may be a way out of our current situation. But now that we’re reading Daniel, we have an excellent example of what it looks like to live faithfully in the worst of circumstances. We can learn a lot from this book.

Daniel 1:1-2:23:

  • 1-2 – This is to set the scene that this story will happen while the Israelites are in exile.
  • 8-16 – Like in many other stories in Scripture, it is important to trust in God for provision and not to rely on others in any way. Eating the king’s food and drinking his wine would have been a way of relying on and trusting in the Babylonians.
  • 8-9 – The king asks the wise men to tell him what his dream means, but he refuses to tell them the dream.
  • 20-23 – Daniel’s prayer is one of humility and seeking God’s wisdom and provision.

1 Peter 3:8-4:6:

  • 13-15 – The way we live our lives is a big part of our witness. We must live righteously so people don’t have anything to question, but if they do anyway, we must be ready to share the gospel.
  • 1-6 – As believers, we are called to live like Christ and leave behind our old ways.

Psalm 119:65-80:

  • 67 – When we encounter God, it should show through a change in our lives.

Proverbs 28:14:

  • We harden our hearts through perpetually choosing sin over faithfulness. Perpetually choosing sin is guaranteed to destroy us.

November 23 – Daily Notes – Amanda

throwing caution

Salvation is a free gift. We can’t earn it. That is so freeing…but…it should free us to do more good, live more like Christ, and serve more. It should not, in our minds, give us free license to sin more because, hey, what’s the harm? Be grateful for your free gift and act accordingly.

Ezekiel 45:13-46:24:

  • 18-25 – These festivals and others are spelled out in Numbers 23.
  • 1-18 – The prince had special instructions on how to handle offerings and other rituals in the temple.

1 Peter 1:13-2:10:

  • 14-21 – Our call is to live like Christ. Because he lived a holy life, we are to do so as well. We know this is a worthy call because he died and rose again.
  • 1-3 – We are to turn away from our sin and long for God’s goodness and guidance.
  • 9-10 – We should take it seriously and act upon it that we were saved.

Psalm 119:33-48:

  • 36-37 – A difficult prayer to pray because it might mean we actually have to turn from our selfish ways and live for God.

Proverbs 28:11:

  • 11 – Wealth does not equal wisdom.

October 18 – Daily Notes – Amanda

charlton-heston

How many times this year has Scripture revisited God rescuing the Israelites from Egypt? It is their constant pillar reminding and assuring them of God’s faithfulness. What is yours? What event or circumstance do you look back on when you struggle to trust? A particular time God provided for you in a specific way? A time when you were rescued from a bad situation? A miracle that can’t be explained in any way but God? Think about that today, particularly if you’re facing a trial.

Jeremiah 31:27-32:44:

  • 31-34 – God declares a new covenant with the Israelites since the last one was broken and forgotten.
  • 1-5 – Zedekiah was the king of Judah appointed by the king of Babylon.
  • 6-15 – Jeremiah’s opportunity to buy the field was proof sent from God that he would fulfill his promises of restoration.
  • 16-23 – Note how many times God’s rescuing Israel from Egypt is revisited in order to offer hope of God’s faithfulness in the future.
  • 26-35 – Judah’s sin had greatly grieved God. They worshipped idols offered sacrifices to other gods just like the foreign nations.
  • 36-41 – God’s anger morphs into abiding love as he describes drawing his people back to himself and making them his own again.

1 Timothy 3:1-16:

  • 1-7 – Overseers (or leaders in the faith) have higher standards they must live up to.
  • 8-13 – Deacons, a different level in church leadership, also had a higher standard to live by. Their wives were also held to an elevated standard.

Psalm 88:1-18:

  • 1 – Here, and then again in verse 13, the psalmist declares that he is faithful in prayer despite feeling left and forsaken by God. That kind of commitment can only stem from knowing that God will eventually come through.

Proverbs 25:20-22:

  • 20 – Know your audience. A heavy heart needs you to mourn with it. Don’t make it worse.
  • 21-22 – Kill them with kindness.

October 3 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Scott Peterson

When we cheer for or celebrate the tragedies of others, God is not pleased. Today’s proverb reminds us of that. We may disagree with the person or their actions or principles, but we are not to find joy in their misfortune. Try to remember this nugget of wisdom next time you think someone “gets what they deserve”.

Jeremiah 1:1-2:30:

  • 4-10 – Like several others called by God, Jeremiah has an excuse of why he can’t possibly be God’s instrument. God disagrees and assures him that he will.
  • 13-14 – Babylon is to the north and eventually fulfills this prophecy.
  • 18 – Jeremiah will be protected by God as long as he is serving God.
  • 1-30 – Through Jeremiah, God remembers the connection he had with Israel and then how sharply they turned from him. They cannot deny how much they’ve forsaken him because he gives specific examples.

Philippians 4:1-23:

  • 2 – Just so you don’t feel dumb, here are phonetic spellings of the two names here: You-o-de-uh and Sin-te-kay.
  • 4-7 – When we release things to God in prayer, we are free not to worry anymore. God’s peace can comfort us and give us confidence that the situation will be resolved.
  • 8 – This verse reminds us where our minds should be. We allow so much filth into our thought life, it is hard to be focused on the good, true, and pure.
  • 10-13 – Paul doesn’t speak simply in “what if’s”, he had learned to trust God with a little or a lot.

Psalm 75:1-10:

  • This psalm delineates the differences in the treatment of the righteous and the wicked.

Proverbs 24:17-20:

  • 17-18 – Everyone is God’s child. We should not gain joy from another’s misfortunes.

September 21 – Daily Notes – Amanda

water cycle

Today is a nature themed day. In Isaiah, we read about God making the sun move backwards, and in our psalm, we read of God’s provision for the earth. Isn’t it fascinating how creation works? God’s intricate design allows us to breath air that plants then filter so we can breath it again. Water evaporates and then condensates in clouds so it can rain and provide for plants, animals, and us. It’s pretty incredible when you really think about it.

Isaiah 37:1-38:22:

  • 1-7 – Hezekiah is a faithful king and reaches out to Isaiah to seek his help in calling upon God in his time of distress.
  • 4 – “Rabshakeh” is the Assyrian king’s chief cupbearer, which would make him a very high-ranking official.
  • 14-20 – Hezekiah is not pleading to God based on his own merit, he is pleading to God’s sovereignty and goodness. He also asks that God save his people so that God may be glorified. This should be our desire in everything we ask God – that he might be glorified through showing his goodness.
  • 21-35 – God responds to Hezekiah’s prayer.
  • 36-38 – God told the people of Judah they didn’t need to worry and then he proved it.
  • 1-22 – Hezekiah pleads to the Lord to extend his life and the Lord does.
  • 7-8 – There is one other account of God stopping or moving the sun. It is found in Joshua 10 when Joshua needed the sun to stand still in order to defeat their enemies.

Galatians 6:1-18:

  • 1-5 – We are to care for our friends and help each other out with our difficulties. We have to be careful not to allow this practice to cause us to take on the other person’s sins though.
  • 7-10 – From the good we do in the world, good things come. This might mean we are blessed or someone else is, but good comes.

Psalm 65:1-13:

  • David gives God praise for all the ways he provides for the earth. God not only created nature but he made it beautiful and beneficial. He deserves praise for this.

Proverbs 23:24:

  • It makes sense that a father would delight in a wise, righteous son.

August 24 – Daily Notes – Amanda

tiny and big

The theme of several of the readings today seem to put us in our place. We are human and finite. God is big, powerful, and ultimately in control. And while this could be read as limiting or squashing us, like it did for David, it should give us hope. The ultimate outcome is not in our hands. We don’t have that kind of pressure. But we serve the God who is in control and who has our best in his plans and has the power to bring those plans to fruition. God in control is a good thing.

Job 12:1-15:35:

  • 12:1-13:19 – Job contends that he has become a laughing stock and recognizes the power of God.
  • 13:20-14:22 – Job switches into a prayer to God. He is clearly incredibly discouraged. He even asks, in verse 14:13, for God to let him die for a while until God’s wrath subsides so he can then come back and serve God with joy. Job makes a valiant effort at remaining faithful.
  • 15:1-35 – Eliphaz speaks to Job again, now with more force. Eliphaz begins to accuse Job of thinking of himself more highly than he ought.

1 Corinthians 15:29-58:

  • 29 – Though it’s uncertain what this means exactly, it’s presumed that the Corinthians had started the practice of being baptized on behalf of people who didn’t come to faith before they died.
  • 29-34 – This argument against those who say there is no resurrection from the dead for people continues from yesterday’s reading.
  • 45 – Paul, once again, compares Adam and Jesus. They are considered the first man and the last man. One brought death, the other brought life.
  • 55 – This verse is quoted in the Charles Wesley hymn, “Christ the Lord is Risen Today”.

Psalm 39:1-13:

  • Jeduthun, who this psalm is written to, was a Levite appointed to be one of the masters of music by King David.
  • 4-7 – Though David’s words seem somewhat hopeless, talking about how minor our lives are, he continues to put his hope in the Lord.

Proverbs 21:30-31:

  • Powerful and reassuring words that we can work and strive, and it’s good for us to do our part, but ultimately, the Lord determines and owns victory.

August 9 – Daily Notes – Amanda

double standard

There are double-standards in the world. Some are frustrating and unfair, while others are totally necessary. In today’s 1 Corinthians reading there is a justified double-standard. It is that believers are held to one moral standard while non-believers are not. We cannot expect non-believers to abide by God’s commands, but we as believers should and should even help one another do so. Yes, it’s a double-standard, but it is a necessary one for believers and non-believers alike.

Ezra 8:21-9:15:

  • 21-23 – Ezra told the Babylonians God would take care of them on their journey, so now he had to put his money where his mouth is. This is why he has the people all call on the Lord through fasting and prayer.
  • 31 – God hears their prayers for protection on their journey and answers them.
  • 1-2 – The Israelites, and particularly the priests, had just finished traveling safely, because of God’s provisions, and have just completed their burnt offering, and immediately they’re breaking one of the main laws God has given them – to be set apart.
  • 6-15 – Ezra’s prayer is honest and forthcoming. He confesses God’s goodness to his people and that they continue to sin against him. Particularly starting in vs. 13, Ezra seems to be very humbled by God’s graciousness in continuing to care for them despite their continued lack of faithfulness.

1 Corinthians 5:1-13:

  • 9-11 – This is an interesting perspective. This is encouraging us not to try to avoid all sinners or even those who are still caught up in sin, but to avoid those who call themselves believers and are currently engaging in any of the sins listed. As believers we are called to a higher standard.
  • 12-13 – Our moral law and faithfulness to Christ is not to be expected of those who do not believe, but we are to hold our own to Christ’s standards.

Psalm 31:1-8:

  • 5 – Jesus repeats the first part of this verse when dying on the cross.
  • 6-8 – David continually gives acknowledgment and praise to God for providing protection from his enemies.

August 4 – Daily Notes – Amanda

pray for you

Have you ever wanted to pray for someone but not known how? It’s easy for that to happen. Often we know someone is struggling but don’t know how. Other times people just pop into our brains and we feel the urge to pray for them. If this happens to you, pray 1 Corinthians 1:4-8 over them. It’s a pretty great prayer for anyone.

2 Chronicles 35:1-36:23:

  • 1-19 – There had been significant periods of time, while under bad kings, that the Israelites did not observe Passover. This may seem like tedious information, but it’s showing that the Israelites were doing their best to be faithful here.
  • 20-22 – Josiah was faithful for most of his life, but in the end, he tried to oppose the will of God and died trying.
  • 9 – Jehoiachin is different than Jehoiakim. It’s easy to read quickly and miss that subtle transition.
  • 15 – These “messengers” were the prophets. In the gospels, particularly in parables, there are often people who are trying to bring messages who are ignored or rejected. These characters represent the prophets as well.
  • 22-23 – King Cyrus, a king who is not an Israelite, is called to return the exiles to their land and rebuild the temple.

1 Corinthians 1:1-17:

  • This is Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians. Note that letters to different churches tend to have different emphases. He is trying to teach the churches how to live and grow faithfully. Every church has its own hangups in that regard.
  • 4-8 – This is a beautiful way to pray for someone you love and want to encourage.
  • 10-17 – Paul encourages the Corinthians to stop focusing on divisive issues and to recognize that they are all called to and saved by Christ.

Psalm 27:1-6:

  • 1 – Remember this when you have fear of any kind.
  • 2-6 – David speaks with words of great confidence that God will protect him in any and every situation.

Proverbs 20:20-21:

  • God clearly meant the “honor your father and mother” law.

August 3 – Daily Notes – Amanda

connecting

Today we finish up Romans and you’ll notice Paul ends by trying to connect believers together. In most of his letter conclusions he attempts to connect the churches with other believers he’s worked with. We should take a note here. It’s important, as believers, to be connected with other believers.

2 Chronicles 33:14-34:33:

  • 1- Strangely, Josiah is not the youngest king to ever start his reign. Joash started ruling at age 7.
  • 8-13 – Unfaithful kings tended to let the temple fall into disrepair. Both boy kings took the offerings of the people to put it to temple reparations.
  • 27-28 – Even though the people had been evil, the king still had love for them and would have been pained to see them suffer.

Romans 16:8-27:

  • 8-16 – In Paul’s conclusion to the Romans, he is doing his best to connect the believers with others they might encounter.
  • 17-19 – Satan does not like it when people are faithful and make faithful decisions. He tries to deceive and turn them with things and people who seem holy-ish.

Psalm 26:1-12:

  • 2 – This is a pretty scary prayer to pray. This is inviting God to look into all the part of us we normally try to hide.

Proverbs 20:19:

  • Often the person who tells you great gossip will tell yours as well. Better not to associate with them at all.