September 19 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Isaiah reminds us that our strength comes in repentance. Though it’s difficult and sometimes feels weak to admit wrong, do it anyway. Plus, Chicago encourages you to as well.

Isaiah 30:12-33:12:

  • 15-17 – Judah’s strength, and ours for that matter, is in repentance and humility before the Lord. Our strength is through him.
  • 19-22 – Though the Israelites had faced a difficult time of oppression, God promises them that they will be restored to him. Vs. 21 is a powerful explanation of how God leads us through the Holy Spirit.
  • 1-9 – The Kingdom of Judah feared the Assyrians, but God reminds them that their fear is misguided. They can trust in the protection of God no matter how scary their opponents are. They have no need to fear.
  • 15-20 – Though so much of Isaiah speaks of punishment and difficulties the Israelites and other nations have brought upon themselves, there are glimmers of hope, like this passage, that remind the Israelites that there will be restoration one day.
  • 1-12 – Once again, Assyria is in trouble.

Galatians 5:1-12:

  • 1 – Christ died for us in order to set us free from the slavery of sin. Yet some of the Israelites were trying to put themselves back under the yolk of the law.
  • 5-6 – We are no longer under any covenant other than that of Christ’s death and resurrection. We do not need to conform to those laws or practices, but simply need to rely on the grace of Christ.
  • 7-12 – Like at the beginning of the letter, Paul is shocked that the Galatians have so quickly forgotten or turned away from what he taught them.
  • 12 – This is obviously a little harsh, but also a play on the fact that those he opposes are teaching circumcision.

Psalm 63:1-11:

  • 1-8 – David’s desire for God is unmatched by other followers. He equates his need for God with his need for sustenance.

September 14 – Daily Notes – Amanda

work

Who do you work for? Yes, that is a trick question. When asked that question, I answer, “Munger Place Church”. The truth is, no matter how you fill in the blank, the correct answer is “I work for God”. This is how we should view our daily tasks – as done for God. When we feel like slacking off, cheating, or lying, we must remember that we’re not getting back at our jerk of a boss, we’re disrespecting God.

Isaiah 15:1-18:7:

  • 15:1-16:14 – This is the prophecy against Moab. The Moabites were continual enemies of Israel and tended to seek out wars. The end of the prophecy is that Moab will end up weak.
  • 17:1-18:7 – This prophecy is against Damascus, a city in Syria. The Syrians were tough and were also gifted warriors.

Galatians 1:1-24:

  • 6-9 – Jesus warns about this kind of “hearer of the word” in the parable of the 4 seeds. He explains that some hearers shoot up quickly but don’t have roots so they burn up quickly. The Galatians were quick to turn to another option after they had accepted the gospel of Christ.
  • 10 – This is difficult, but a challenge we should all pursue: to work to please God instead of man.
  • 12-14 – In Paul’s early years, he was a Christian-persecuting Jew. He cannot take credit for what Christ did in him because it was against all odds.

Psalm 58:1-11:

  • David speaks out against those who judge wrongly. He knows there is ultimately a reward for those who are righteous, but for now, the unrighteous are able to flourish.

September 3 – Daily Notes – Amanda

seesaw

Have you ever been on a seesaw when the weight distribution on either end is way off? One person ends up doing all the work. It’s not the other person’s fault. They just physically can’t get down to the ground. This is a crude analogy of what Paul’s talking about when he encourages believers not to marry nonbelievers. They are simply not equally matched when it comes to their spiritual lives.

Ecclesiastes 4:1-6:12:

  • 9-12 – These verses are key in helping us understand the importance of friendship and being in relationship in general. We are designed to lean on others and have them lean on us as well.
  • 13 – The things that we value, wealth and power, are not always the things that benefit us most.
  • 1-3 – These verses encourage us to enter God’s presence with reverence and awe. We are to listen for God first instead of assuming we know what he wants and how we should act.
  • 4-7 – It is better not to tell God we’re going to do something and not do it than to never promise anything at all. This is similar to the parable Jesus tells in Matthew 21.
  • 1-6 – Possessions truly don’t matter. Most of the time, when we have lots of things, we’re worried about maintaining possession of those things and often don’t enjoy them. This is a waste of life.

2 Corinthians 6:14-7:7:

  • 14-18 – These verses are often used when explaining why believers should not marry nonbelievers. Similar arguments could be made for going into business with nonbelievers. Believers cannot expect nonbelievers to have the same priorities, beliefs, and understandings as them. As believers we are called to be transformed and to put Christ first. This effects every aspect of life.
  • 5-7 – Paul’s unquenchable joy is so apparent here. He explains to the Corinthians the difficulties he has faced, but continues to rejoice in hearing of other believers joining in the battle with him.

Psalm 47:1-9:

  • Our God is worthy of our praise. We should sing to him and honor him with song.

Proverbs 22:16:

  • God does not take kindly to the powerful oppressing the weak in any circumstance. He calls us to care for the poor, the widow, the orphan, the child, and the one who is new to the faith.

August 30 – Daily Notes – Amanda

give me

I have come to hate the word “deserve”. It wreaks of entitlement and, honestly, what do we actually deserve? In today’s Job reading, Job is trying to rebut Elihu. Job argues that just because we live righteously, we are not guaranteed blessings. We live righteously because that’s what we’re called to do. We don’t, then, deserve a reward for doing so.

Job 34:1-36:33:

  • 1-37 – Elihu continues to assert, like Job’s friends, that God cannot do anything unjust. He also contrasts Job with someone who repents suggesting that Job has not and needs to. They continue to assume that Job has sinned to cause all this destruction.
  • 1-16 – Elihu continues to argue with Job and correct him for saying that righteousness doesn’t earn a reward from God.
  • 1-33 – Though Elihu, for the most part sings praise to God for his greatness, he also calls himself “perfect in knowledge”, which seems to equate himself with at least the knowledge of God. This seems counter to the majority of his thoughts.

2 Corinthians 4:1-12:

  • 5 – This is something we must make sure we are doing. We are not trying to bring glory to ourselves or promote ourselves as saviors, but to share Christ with the nations.
  • 7 – We are the jars of clay. Jars of clay are fragile and hold the thing that is important. We have the Holy Spirit inside us.
  • 8-12 – Though Paul and his companions had received a lot of persecution and difficulty, they were still able to share the gospel. Nothing had been able to destroy them.

Psalm 44:1-8:

  • 1-3 – These three verses explain the importance of sharing our faith with younger generations. The Sons of Korah believed in God’s power and provision because their fathers told them how he had displayed it.

Proverbs 22:10-12:

  • 11-12 – Kindness and graciousness will always gain you favor, while hateful words are eventually found out.

August 26 – Daily Notes – Amanda

sweep the leg

Job makes a good point in today’s reading. It is one that many of us, who are trying to live faithfully, have thought about at some point. Punishment and suffering don’t always seem to coincide with sin. In fact, many sinful people seem to get ahead because of their sin. Throughout Scripture God calls us to faithfulness and promises to reward it. That reward may not come in this lifetime, but we know that God’s promises are true and we can trust him.

Job 20:1-22:30:

  • 1-29 – Zophar continues to tell Job about the fate of the unfaithful. He explains that they start off wealthy and blessed but God takes that away because of their unfaithfulness. This suggests that this is what is happening to Job.
  • 1-34 – Job responds to Zophar in disagreement. He explains that wicked people seem to do just fine and that wickedness and negative life results do not seem to coincide.
  • 1-30 – Eliphaz once again tries to get Job to see his sin, because, due to what is happening, it must be abundant. Eliphaz encourages him to try to get back to right relationship with God.

2 Corinthians 1:1-11:

  • Second Corinthians is Paul’s second letter to the church of Corinth. It is the same church he wrote to in 1 Corinthians, not two separate churches.
  • 3-7 – Paul is referring to persecution against Christians when he talks about the suffering he endures for the salvation of the Corinthians.

Psalm 40:11-17:

  • David is clearly in turmoil here and is weighed down by many burdens, but he ends with faith that God will take care of him. This is a good lesson for each of us. Times get difficult and we can feel weighed down, but we can always turn to God.

Proverbs 22:2-4:

  • 2 – Both the society of the original hearers of these proverbs as well as our current society tend to rank people. Money is one of the biggest ranking scales. But God sees beyond our monetary wealth.
  • 3-4 – Throughout Proverbs there is a continual juxtaposition between the wise and the foolish, their actions, and their results. These verses continue to spell this out.

August 18 – Daily Notes – Amanda

makeup

Isn’t it amazing what God can use? We think of God using those who can preach or those who have a heart for service, but we view other gifts and attributes as fairly neutral when it comes to God’s work. That is a mistake. With Esther, God uses her beauty to get her near the king during a key time in Jewish history. It makes you think, what in you, can God use?

Esther 1:1-3:15:

  • 10-12 – Eunuchs were often assigned to female royalty because they could be trusted to not assault her sexually. It was unheard of, even for the queen, to not obey the king’s commands.
  • 10-11 – Esther and Mordecai were Jews living under a Persian king. Mordecai told Esther, as she entered the king’s harem, not to reveal this part of her identity.
  • 12-14 – After a year’s worth of dolling up, each girl got one sexual encounter to impress the king. If she didn’t, she was relegated to the harem for the rest of their lives.
  • 19-23 – Though the king still didn’t know Esther’s relationship to Mordecai, he still got credit for saving the king’s life.
  • 1-6 – It’s not that Haman didn’t want to harm Mordecai, he didn’t want to hurt just Mordecai. He wanted to go ahead and hurt all the Jews.
  • 12-15 – Haman is given the power to demand the destruction of all the Jews in the land and he even sets a date for it to happen.

1 Corinthians 11:17-34:

  • 23-26 – After Jesus’ death, we see, very early on, Christians participating in communion. Paul is reminding them what it looked like.
  • 27-29 – This is why we have a time of confession before we take communion.

Psalm 35:17-28:

  • 17 – This verse is different from many of David’s psalms in that it recognizes God’s presence but notes that God is failing to act. Most often, David acts as though God has turned his face away and or has forsaken him. Here he recognizes that God sees what is going on.

Proverbs 21:19-20:

  • 20 – The wise man takes care of what he has and keeps it safe. The foolish man uses is frivolously.

July 11 – Daily Notes – Amanda

getting caught

We’ve talked about this before. I hate negative consequences!! Don’t you? If I have the opportunity, I like to shift the blame anywhere other myself. It’s easier that way. Unfortunately, we often blame God for the negative consequences of our sins. “Why would God let me lose my job!?!” we cry. When really the question should be, “Why did I break company policy hoping to get ahead?”

1 Chronicles 11:1-12:18:

  • 4-9 – Jerusalem became the central city for the Israelites and remains so to this day, but it was not so until this conquest of David.
  • 15-19 – Though David’s actions seem a bit ungrateful, he pours the water out as a drink offering because he considers himself not worthy of their extreme devotion. The reason David wanted the water in the first place is because he was originally from Bethlehem.
  • Though you may not recognize or remember many of the names in the lists from today’s reading, recognize that the chronicler is reminding us that there were a great deal of capable, dedicated fighting men, particularly those dedicated to David’s service.

Acts 28:1-31:

  • 8 – Because of the snake incident, the people already thought Paul was a god. His ability to heal Publius’ father as well as the other ill people probably only solidified this thought.
  • 16 – Remember that Paul is still technically imprisoned and awaiting trial in front of Caesar by his own request.
  • 20 – He’s referring to Jesus as “the hope of Israel.”
  • 25-28 – It would make sense that the Jews should have recognized Jesus as the Messiah since he fulfilled so many of the prophecies they knew. Many, however, were unable to see it. The gentiles didn’t have as many preconceived notions of who the Messiah should be, so they were more open to Jesus being it.
  • 29 – Did anyone else notice that there’s no Acts 28:29? One does exist, and it’s pretty inconsequential, but many translations leave it out.

Psalm 9:1-12:

  • 9-10 – Confirmation that when we seek God, he will be faithful to meet us. He does not hide from or forsake us.

Proverbs 19:1-3:

  • 1 – This is in exact contrast to how our society lives and thinks.
  • 3 – So true!! How often do we blame God for the consequences we receive for our own poor choices?

July 6 – Daily Notes – Amanda

donut

There are silly things we are tempted by like donuts and paying too much for a pair of jeans we don’t need. But today’s psalm deals with more serious temptations and, unfortunately, they’re ones we face just as often. These temptations entice us to trust them more than we trust God. These are things like, our own strength, money, success, etc. Though they’re sometimes hard to recognize, what tempts you to trust it in stead of God?

1 Chronicles 2:18-4:4:

  • 18-20 – Though this just feels like a big list of names, it’s interesting to see names you recognize from stories. Bezalel, for instance, was one of the skilled workers who helped create the tabernacle.
  • 1-9 – Yes, David had a lot of sons and a lot of wives. Notice that Solomon, who became the next king after David is way down on the list of sons.

Acts 24:1-27:

  • 22-27 – It seems as if Felix might come to faith based on Paul’s teachings, but it doesn’t seem that he does. Instead he leaves Paul in prison, which means he has now been in prison for 2 years.

Psalm 4:1-8:

  • 5-8 – These verses hit hard the idea that we are tempted to trust in many other things but our true rest and comfort come only from God.

Proverbs 18:16-18:

  • 17 – This verse backs up the adage that there are always two sides to every story. Withhold judgment of decisions until you have heard from both parties.

July 1 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Are you a terrible singer? Can’t carry a tune in a bucket? That’s ok! You can’t tell me you don’t belt it out in the shower or when alone in your car. Praising God is the perfect time to stretch out those vocal chords. Today’s psalm reminds us that we’re all called to give God praise through song. He deserves it and loves it…even if you sound awful.

2 Kings 18:13-19:37:

  • 16 – Gold that was, at one time, given as an offering to the Lord to build his home amongst the Israelites, was now stripped off and given to a foreign king. The change in the state of affairs is drastic.
  • 19-25 – A message is sent from the king of Assyria to Hezekiah, the king of Judah, taunting him and saying that God will not be able to save Judah.
  • 28-35 – Hezekiah was a king faithful to the Lord. Clearly the king of Assyria is trying to do everything he can to get the people of Judah to turn against Hezekiah and God.
  • 36-1 – Hezekiah’s men all tore their clothes as a sign of deep sorrow and disgrace. They were afraid that the king of Assyria might be right.
  • 6-7 – Isaiah, the next great prophet, assures Hezekiah and his men that God will rescue them and the king of Assyria will actually die in his own land.
  • 10-13 – The king of Assyria’s bullying tactics are convincing. All the other kings Assyria had gone up against had fallen. Granted, their gods weren’t God.
  • 29-31 – God gives Judah a sign that he actually is speaking and they can trust him.

Acts 21:1-16:

  • 10-14 – Though Christian persecution was rampant in Jerusalem, Paul knew he had to go there. All his companions tried to convince him not to, but he was well prepared to face persecution for the sake of the gospel.

Psalm 149:1-9:

  • 3 – We are to praise the Lord with song…even if we’re not that talented. Just make a joyful noise.

June 30 – Daily Notes – Amanda

ripple effect

Have your sins ever impacted someone else? (The answer here is “yes”.) You cheated on a test and it messed up the curve for others. You stole from a store and the cashier got in trouble. You cheated on your spouse and it broke up your family. Our sins are not simply our own problem. As Israel and Judah are being rejected by God and destroyed by other nations, it’s hard not to remember Jeroboam’s selfish acts as he was taking over his portion of the kingdom. He chose to listen to bad advice and it hurt the Israelites for generations to come.

2 Kings 17:1-18:12:

  • 6-18 – After a steady series of sinful kings and repetitive sinning by the nation, God allows the Assyrians to capture all the Israelites and take them to their country. This makes it clear that they are now separated from God because they no longer have their promised land or any of their identifying marks that were to set them apart for God.
  • 21 – The split of the two kingdoms of Israel, the sinfulness of the country, and the eventual exile of both kingdoms (only one has happened so far) all trace back to Jeroboam’s sinfulness.
  • 34-40 – The Israelites had been given every opportunity to choose to live faithfully. They continued to choose not to and broke every part of their covenant with God. Because of this, God allowed them to face the consequences of all their unfaithfulness.
  • 1-4 – Hezekiah is king of Judah and chooses to live faithfully.

Acts 20:1-38:

  • In case you’re getting confused about Paul’s journeys – where he’s been and where he’s headed, here is a map of all his travels Paul's journeys Oh, and who knew, but there’s a board game of Paul’s journeys as well, for some good old fashioned holy family fun.
  • 7-12 – Peter was able to raise Tabitha from the dead and Paul raises this young man. It seems like it was the right thing to do considering Paul had literally bored him to death.
  • 18-35 – Paul, on this his third of four journeys, knows his ministry on earth is coming to an end, but he is satisfied with his work and is willing to suffer persecution in order to share the gospel.

Psalm 148:1-14:

  • In Romans 1:20, Paul explains that every part of creation testifies to God’s greatness somehow. This psalm seems to confirm that.

Proverbs 18:6-7:

  • A creative way of saying our mouths write checks our rears can’t cash.