September 8 – Daily Notes – Amanda

prophet Isaiah

Isaiah is one of the most recognizable prophets. It is the most quoted Old Testament book and is one of the longest books in the Bible. Despite all that, it can be a challenge to follow. Isaiah sometimes uses confusing language and he repeats things a lot. So, here’s a little synopsis to keep you on track: in the first half, look for prophecies of destruction against the Israelites; in the second half, look for prophecies of restoration; sprinkled throughout, look for prophecies that foretell a coming Messiah.

Isaiah 1:1-2:22:

  • The book of Isaiah is told from the perspective of Isaiah the prophet about a vision he has had. Sometimes he will quote God, but he will identify it when he is. It is set before the Babylonian exile.
  • 2-17 – This is a vision God has given Isaiah explaining that the Israelites are sinful and that God is tired of receiving meaningless sacrifices from people who go on sinning. They are no longer pleasing to him.
  • 18 – There seems to be a plan in place for how God will restore the Israelites to himself.
  • 1-4 – This is a vision for future peace and perfection.
  • 5-22 – Though the majority of Isaiah addresses Judah, this vision calls upon the house of Jacob, which is most likely the Northern Kingdom of Israel, to repent.

2 Corinthians 10:1-18:

  • 2-6 – Paul is hoping he doesn’t have a major spiritual battle to fight when he is with the Corinthians. He is not shy to do so, but he’s hoping there’s not a need there.
  • 11 – Paul doesn’t just ask others to live faithfully, he does so himself.
  • 17-18 – Our only boasts should be in what the Lord has done in the world and in us.

Psalm 52:1-9:

  • This Psalm is from David’s perspective and contrasts his faithfulness and connection to God with someone else who delights in evil.

Proverbs 22:26-27:

  • This advises against making promises you can’t keep.

July 4 – Daily Notes – Amanda

glimmer of hope

Did you catch the glimmer of hope? At the end of 2 Kings, it seems like all hope is lost until the last four verses. The king of Babylon, in a shocking move, releases Jehoiachin, a member of David’s line, from prison. It seems that even in exile all hope may not be lost.

2 Kings 23:31-25:30:

  • 31 – This is not Jeremiah the prophet.
  • 32 – Interesting that Josiah was more faithful than any of the kings before him and yet his son, Jehoahaz, did evil.
  • 33-35 – Pharaoh Neco removes Jehoahaz from the throne after only 3 months and puts Eliakim/Jehoiakim in power. Pharaoh’s appointment and name change makes it clear that the king of Judah is now subject to him.
  • 3 – This is Manasseh the king, not the tribe.
  • 1-9 – Jehoiakim followed the Pharaoh and Jehoiakin did what was evil.
  • 20 – God finally allows the remainder of the Israelites (Judah) to get what they keep, through their sin, asking for – to no longer be in God’s presence or under his rule.
  • 9 – The Babylonians burn down the temple in Jerusalem – this was the most significant sign of God’s presence the Israelites had. This symbolically shows God and the Israelites officially separating.
  • 12 – A few people are left in Judah, but they leave the lowest of the low.
  • 27-30 – Evil-merodach (an unfortunate name), king of Babylon, shows kindness to Jehoiachin, which shows a slight bit of hope that exile might not be forever and Israel and the line of David may have some hope.

Acts 22:17-23:10:

  • 17-21 – The Jews in the synagogues knew Paul’s past and it seemed to be a barrier for some of them to believe what he now believed – that Jesus was the Messiah. Thus, God sent him to the Gentiles.
  • 25 – It was illegal to use whips to gain a confession from a Roman citizen. Clearly the powers that be were unaware of his citizenship.
  • 3 – “Whitewashed wall” is a metaphor for a hypocrite. Looks good on the outside, but who knows what it’s hiding.

July 3 – Daily Notes – Amanda

opportunity

In today’s Acts reading, Paul has been imprisoned, which obviously sounds terrible. How would you handle it? I know I’d probably whine and get down and defeated. Paul acts differently. He takes the time to explain why he does what he does. He had been a faithful Jew who strictly obeyed the law, but Christ’s love and grace were powerful enough to convert him and then to cause him to share that good news with others. What opportunities do you have to share your faith story?

2 Kings 22:3-23:30:

  • 3-7 – The temple, due to sinful leadership and neglect, had fallen into disrepair so Josiah used his position as king to restore it.
  • 14-17 – The prophetess Huldah lets Judah know it too will be destroyed because of its sin.
  • 18-20 – Because King Josiah had been faithful and repentant, he would die before the destruction occurred.
  • 1-24 – Josiah took the law he found in the temple very seriously and methodically destroyed any remnants of anything dedicated to any other God.

Acts 21:37-22:16:

  • 4-16 – Paul addresses his captors by sharing his conversion experience and why he switched from devout Jew who persecuted Christians to tireless Christian from a Jewish background.

Psalm 1:1-6:

  • This Psalm contrasts a person who’s delight is in the law of the Lord versus someone who is wicked.

Proverbs 18:11-12:

  • 11 – Solomon makes it clear that wealth is a false sense of security.

July 2 – Daily Notes – Amanda

celebration

As of yesterday, we are officially halfway through the Bible! Woohoo!! Give yourself a pat on the back! Bake yourself a cake! This is a great accomplishment, so take a deep breath and enjoy it. You’ve done a great job!

2 Kings 20:1-22:2:

  • 3-7 – The Lord hears Hezekiah’s prayer and answers it. God heals Hezekiah from a life threatening illness using a fig cake, or what is described in other translations as a fig poultice.
  • 12-19 – Hezekiah is overly hospitable to the king of Babylon, Merodach-baladan. It’s possible he’s trying to impress him with his riches so they won’t want to attack. Though it won’t happen for a while, Babylon will eventually take his people into exile.
  • 19 – Though Hezekiah’s response seems a little arrogant or lackadaisical, commentaries tell us, because he was a faithful king, his response is more likely one of thanks for the peace they have at the moment.
  • 7 – This was the tribe of Judah. God claims this tribe forever and it is the tribe that Jesus belonged to.
  • 1-9 – Manasseh was pretty much the worst of the worst. He should not be confused with Joseph’s son Manasseh who was the patriarch of one of the 12 tribes.
  • 12-15 – Israel had already been conquered and exiled, but Judah remained where they belonged. Manasseh’s leadership puts it over the edge though, and God explains that he’s opening them up for attack too.

Acts 21:17-36:

  • 23-24 – These four men had taken the Nazirite vow. At some time before the vow they must have done something against the vow they were taking, which caused them to need to shave their heads and be purified for 7 days. Paul sponsors them financially.
  • 28-29 – It was illegal to bring a non-Jew into the temple and Trophimus was Greek. It seems that Paul did not actually do this and even if he had, according to the law, the people should have attacked Trophimus, not Paul.

Psalm 150:1-6:

  • 6 – No excuses. That means you too.

Proverbs 18:9-10:

  • 9 – Verses in Colossians and Ephesians also encourage us to work to the best of our ability. We are to work like we’re working for God, not man.

What to Expect – Week 27

dominos

This week we finish 2 Kings and begin 1 Chronicles. The end of 2 Kings is the beginning of Judah’s exile. At this point, we’ve already seen Israel enter exile, but Judah held out a little longer.

Quickly, before we jump into the historical accounts of the Chronicles, let’s recap the highlights of what got us to the point of both the northern and southern kingdoms being in exile:

  • The Israelites demand a human king and reject God as their king.
  • Rehoboam, the 4th king of united Israel is unfair and unkind to his people so they refuse to follow him. The majority of the Israelites follow Jeroboam and form the kingdom of Israel.
  • Israel as much weaker as two kingdoms.
  • Twenty kings in a row of the northern kingdom of Israel are evil.
  • Twelve of the twenty kings of the southern kingdom of Judah are evil.
  • The Israelites of both kingdoms worship other gods and forsake their part of the covenant.

So as we read, this week, about God turning away from the Israelites, remember that he is not unkind and hateful. The Israelites turn their back on God over and over until he has no choice but to allow them to face their consequences.

Reading these consequences sure makes you think about your daily decisions, doesn’t it?

June 22 – Daily Notes – Amanda

good God

It’s important to read the Bible carefully. If only skimming, stories like the one of the King of Moab sacrificing his son, in today’s Acts reading, could be mistaken for something God wanted or chose. God did not want the king to sacrifice his son. God did not ask him to do that. That was the king’s own evil choice. We tend to read the Bible as if everything is telling us to “go and do likewise”. This is simply not the case.

2 Kings 3:1-4:17:

  • 9 – The kingdoms of Israel and Judah had not been united on anything since just after Solomon’s reign.
  • 13 – Elisha learned his sass from Elijah. The king of Israel’s parents worshipped Baal. Elisha is pointing out that the king wants the Lord’s help even though he hasn’t been faithful to the Lord.
  • 17-19 – It is often the simplest things that prove God’s favor or lack there of. Like when wandering in the desert, the Israelites lack water and God provides it.
  • 27 – The King of Moab who sacrificed his son did not do this to honor God. God did not ask this of him.
  • 1-7 – The Lord provided for the woman when it seemed impossible. He multiplied the oil to make it profitable for her so she could take care of herself and her son.
  • 8-10 – Above and beyond hospitality
  • 11-17 – Elisha was blessed and then asked the Lord to bless the woman in return.

Acts 14:8-28:

  • 8-10 – Healings often happened because of faith. This one is simply because Paul saw faith in the crippled man.
  • 11-18 – The people assumed that Paul and Barnabas were their gods in human form. This, for obvious reasons, greatly distressed the men of God.
  • 19-23 – When Paul later writes about suffering for the sake of Christ, he is not speaking figuratively. He truly had suffered greatly to share the gospel.

Psalm 140:1-3:

  • It is pretty incredible that, with so many aggressive enemies, David is still able to focus on and remain faithful to God. At the same time, it is pretty incredible how well God protected David from his enemies.

Proverbs 17:22:

  • Joy, a fruit of the spirit, is more than just enjoyable, it’s life giving.

June 14 – Daily Notes – Amanda

cartoon king

When God warns you of something, you should definitely listen. God knew that he was a better king than any human could ever be, but back in 1 Samuel the Israelites insisted on a human king like all the other nations. In today’s reading, just four kings later, the consequences of poor decisions by human kings is becoming painfully obvious. Israel has now split into two nations, weakening them and setting them up for their ultimate demise.

1 Kings 12:20-13:34:

  • It’s about to start getting confusing with who was king of where when. Here’s a simple chart to help you keep them straight.
  • 25-33 – Jeroboam has every reason to trust God because he had made it clear that he would keep him in power because of his great love for David. Jeroboam almost immediately loses trust and builds golden calves so the wouldn’t lose his portion of Israelites.
  • 11-25 – This story gets confusing with the old prophet and the original prophet and the man of God. Note that the prophet should have listened to God above anything else. Ultimately, listening to the other prophet caused his death.
  • 33-34 – Jeroboam continued to stray further and further from God’s will.

Acts 9:26-43:

  • 26 – Sometimes the consequences of our previous sins linger.
  • 36-43 – Despite an unfortunate nickname, Tabitha was a great asset to those around her. She served and provided for those around her. Her resurrection also brought many people to faith.

Psalm 132:1-18:

  • 11-12 – In our 1 Kings reading we are currently seeing God trying to find ways to keep David’s line in the throne though they continually turn against him.

May 22 – Daily Notes – Amanda

patience

Apparently there are certain concepts that escape us if not repeated at least a thousand times. Proverbs seems to think so. Yet again, in today’s reading, we are reminded that wisdom is shown when we are patient and slow to act or speak. Foolishness is rash and fast moving and fails to think things through. I know I could stand to hear this message on repeat. How about you?

2 Samuel 1:1-2:11:

  • 11-16 – It seems very harsh to us that David kills the young Amalekite who, seemingly, was merciful to a dying Saul. David had deep regard for Saul as the anointed one of God and did not see it as the Amalekite’s job to kill him.
  • 1 – David was faithful in seeking God’s guidance before he would make moves.
  • 4 – David is now officially king over Judah. He needed for Saul and his sons to die and to be anointed. Now both have happened.
  • 4-7 – The men of Jabesh-gilead were the ones who took Saul’s body back from the Philistines after the Philistines tortured and dishonored it. David greatly appreciated this because it was honoring to God’s anointed, Saul.
  • 8-11 – One son of Saul was still alive, Ish-bosheth. A portion of the Israelites follow Ish-bosheth as their king, but the majority follow David.

John 12:20-50:

  • 23-24 – Jesus knew that in order to conquer sin and for his mission to multiply, he had to die.
  • 29 – This is the second recording of God speaking audibly directly to or about Jesus. The first is during his baptism.
  • 34-36 – The people could not understand how he could be the Christ and die since their law said the Christ would live forever. They couldn’t reconcile the two. Jesus simply encourages them to follow him while he’s still there.
  • 42-43 – A very convicting passage. Too often we care more about what others think than what pleases God.

Psalm 118:19-29:

  • 22 – This verse is later applied to Jesus. He was rejected, but ultimately our faith was built on him.
  • 24 – A popular, very quotable verse reminding us that each day is a gift from God and should be given back to him with praise.

Proverbs 15:27-28:

  • 28 – The continual theme in Proverbs of wisdom being slow and thoughtful is repeated here.

April 23 – Daily Notes – Amanda

dv1395027

Note the significance of Jesus, the lamb of God, shedding his blood for the people on Passover in relation to what happened on the first Passover.

Judges 1:1-2:9:

  • Judges, for many generations, were the leaders of Israelites. It was not normally an authoritarian leader, but one who relayed God’s plans for the people and helped guide them in following God’s commands. They often led the Israelites into battles as well.
  • 2 – Judah is the appointed leader after Joshua’s death.
  • 6-7 – Based on the information in verse 7, Adoni-Bezek had his fingers and toes cut off because he had performed the same punishment on many other kings.
  • 21-36 – The Israelites had been clearly instructed to remove the current inhabitants from their land, but many of the tribes allowed Canaanites to remain in their land. God wanted the Canaanites out of the promised land because they would influence the Israelites to form allegiances with other gods.
  • 1-5 – God remains faithful in his part of the covenant, but the Israelites fail to do their part so though God will not forsake them, he will also not be able to protect them from the influences of the Canaanites.
  • 6-9 – Joshua doesn’t die twice, it’s just two accounts of the same event.

Luke 21:29-22:13:

  • 3-6 – Though Jesus knew it had to happen, it still must have been extremely hurtful to Jesus that one of his chosen, closest friends and followers not only betrayed him, but sought out an opportunity to betray him.
  • 7-13 – It is quite symbolic that Jesus is killed at the Passover. During the original Passover, the Israelites’ first born were saved by the blood of a lamb that was wiped on the doorframe. Christ’s blood, through his death, also saved all of us who choose to be covered by it.

Psalm 90:1-91:16:

  • 1-7 – God can protect us from so many of our hardships and struggles. When we choose to abide in his shelter, we don’t have to worry about the consequences of sin, because we’re not choosing to sin. This is not to be mistaken as saying, when we abide in God nothing bad will ever happen to us.

Proverbs 13:24-25:

  • This proverb encourages boundaries and discipline for children to assure they know and follow the Lord throughout their lives.

April 9 – Daily Notes – Amanda

chicken or egg

Like the argument of the chicken and the egg, one of the biggest points of conflict between Jesus and the Pharisees was whether Sabbath laws trumped human need or vice versa. Today, in our Luke section, Jesus heals on the Sabbath. He clearly chooses human need over Sabbath Law.

Deuteronomy 33:1-29:

  • Moses offers blessings to each of Israel’s tribes based on the role they tended to play. Some were larger, some had great warriors, some were set aside for teaching God’s law to the rest of the people.
  • 29 – He rounds out his blessing with a reminder of how adeptly God cares for them and that they are truly set apart.

Luke 13:1-21:

  • 10-17 – The synagogue’s authorities yet again become enraged by Jesus’ actions because he “does work” by healing on the Sabbath. Jesus reminds them that they do too do work on the Sabbath, but have found a way to justify it, while he does work on the Sabbath to bless and love people.
  • 18-19 – There are many interpretations of why the mustard seed is a good comparison for the Kingdom of God. Some say that it’s because a mustard seed is tiny and grows quickly into something great. Others say it is because a mustard seed grows in a wild, uncontrollable fashion. Others say it is because the birds make nests in the mustard tree just like we can make a home and be welcomed into the kingdom of God.
  • 20-21 – Leaven activates ingredients do to what they’re supposed to do. Leaven also makes dough rise.

Psalm 78:65-72:

  • There are several times in Scripture where it describes God as silent. Before he calls Samuel and when there were no prophets for 400 years before John the Baptist arrived are some examples.
  • 68 – Judah was the tribe that both David and Jesus came from.

Proverbs 12:25:

  • Anxiety is normally equated with worry. The Bible often equates worry with a lack of trust. God continually gives us reason to trust as he continually proves himself faithful.