December 30 – Daily Notes – Amanda

perfect 10

How do you imagine perfection? Not just partial perfection or perfection in one person, but full, true perfection? God’s kingdom fully on earth is what true perfection looks like. The end of Revelation depicts what the new Jerusalem will look like. It is the return of what God intended for earth. This is something we should long and pray for.

Malachi 1:1-2:17:

  • 1-5 – The words love and hate could be exchanged for “chose” and “did not choose”. God chose Jacob to set up his people. He did not choose Esau. Not only did Esau forego his blessing and birthright, but his descendants often fought against the Israelites. They brought God’s curse upon themselves.
  • 6-14 – The Lord denounces the blemished offerings the priests put before him. These half-hearted offerings showed their lack of devotion to God.
  • 1-9 – The priests had been given special authority. God asked that they honor him and lead the rest of the people in spiritual practices. Here he rebukes them for failing to do so.
  • 10-16 – Scholars disagree on whether this is actually talking about marriage and marrying foreign women or metaphorically speaking of idolatry. Either way, the Judeans were practicing things God did not approve of.

Revelation 21:1-27:

  • 1-7 – This scene depicts God’s kingdom officially and completely coming to earth, like we pray in the Lord’s prayer.
  • 9-27 – The scene depicts the new Jerusalem where God will dwell negating the need for a temple, any other source of light, and presumably many other things necessary in our current construct.

Psalm 149:1-9:

  • 1-5 – So many of the psalms instruct us to praise God and a large percentage of those instruct us to praise him specifically with songs. It is important that we, as a people, do not get out of this habit.

Proverbs 31:10-24:

  • 10-24 – These verses describe an excellent wife. Her characteristics include productivity, generosity, care for others, integrity, and preparedness.

December 25 – Daily Notes – Amanda

showing mercy

How anyone is able to call God cruel or unloving, I can’t understand. Even in reading the widespread wrath of God in Revelation, we see mercy smeared all over it. Even as plagues of destruction are looming, Jesus is calling out for people to repent so he can offer salvation instead of destruction.

Zechariah 8:1-23:

  • 1-8 – God promises to restore Jerusalem and paints a desirable picture of the state to which it will return.
  • 14-17 – God reminds the Israelites of why he brought destruction on their ancestors and explains how he would like for them to live so he can fully prosper them.

Revelation 16:1-21:

  • 1-21 – This describes a series of seven plagues poured out on the unrighteous of the earth.
  • 15 – Here we hear Jesus’ voice inserted in the series of plagues. Jesus is breaking in to give yet another plea for people to repent. The people are hearing what is to come and his hope is to save as many as will turn.

Psalm 144:1-15:

  • 3-8 – David admits humanity’s insignificance in comparison to God and understands that it is a privilege to even be able to request of God. Then he continues to ask for God to reach out to him.

December 22 – Daily Notes – Amanda

chaos

Like the three days Jesus was in the grave, in Revelation, there is a time when evil is winning. We know that it doesn’t win ultimately, but take a minute to think about the chaos, pain, and sorrow that would be associated with evil winning. Now take a minute to praise God that he wins.

Zechariah 2:1-3:10:

  • 6-12 – God declares to those who were taken into exile and have been in Babylon, that he will restore Jerusalem and that even others will turn to God because of God’s restoration of Israel.
  • 1-10 – Part of restoring Jerusalem and the temple was restoring the priests. Joshua’s clean garments are symbolic of his return to God.

Revelation 13:1-18:

  • 1-4 – The people should not be worshipping the beast or the dragon. They are not God. They are some of the many other entities that the world chooses to follow other than God.
  • 5-10 – For a time, evil is allowed to prevail. Those who were not already saved began to follow the evil ruler. Because the saints were temporarily defeated, this was a test of their faithfulness and patient endurance.
  • 11-18 – Like the people of the Lord were marked and sealed for Christ, now those who follow the beast are marked for him.

Psalm 141:1-10:

  • 1-4 – So often our requests of God are to benefit just us. David’s request asks for God’s help to remain faithful.
  • 8-10 – David also asks for safety from his enemies.

December 15 – Daily Notes – Amanda

quiz 100

Want a guaranteed 100 on a pop quiz? Simply ask yourself the questions in verse four of today’s Proverb and answer “God” every time. It’ll work. I promise. And, in the process, be reminded of God’s incredible and matchless power.

Micah 1:1-4:13:

  • 1 – This establishes that God will use Micah as a prophet and that he is to communicate God’s message to a series of kings of Judah.
  • 2-9 – Judah will receive punishment and all the idols will be destroyed because of its sin.
  • 1-11 – God declares the destruction those who work evil will face. Like in other books, God makes clear that he will not tolerate oppression of the weak.
  • 1-12 – This chapter denounces rulers and prophets, but it only denounces those who are not following God and are leading people astray. This is definitely not denouncing all prophets, because it is being spoken through a prophet that God has chosen to use.
  • 6-13 – The Lord promises to rescue Zion. Zion is the mountain where Jerusalem is located.

Revelation 6:1-17:

  • 1-17 – Six of the seven seals are broken by the lamb. As each seal is broken, more of God’s wrath is released onto the earth. This is a part of the final judgment against evil and wickedness.

Psalm 134:1-3:

  • This is another Psalm of Ascent, which would have been recited on the way up to Jerusalem. It must have been a joyful one as they all sang praises as they approached the city.

Proverbs 30:1-4:

  • 4 – These are a series of rhetorical questions to which the answer is always God alone.

December 11- Daily Notes – Amanda

inside

In today’s Amos reading, we find a sentiment repeated numerous times in Scripture and it’s one we could still stand to hear today. Our rituals and meaningless checkmarks do not please God. God doesn’t care how the package is wrapped, he cares what’s in the package. In other words, he wants our hearts to be devoted to him. That is how faithfulness is determined, not by how many faithfulness boxes we check.

Amos 4:1-6:14:

  • 4-13 – The prophet lists all the ways God attempted to get the Israelites’ attention and draw them back to him that failed. He follows that with an ominous statement of “prepare to meet your God” and it doesn’t sound like he means in a good way.
  • 21-27 – This sentiment is repeated several times in Scripture. God doesn’t care about our rituals and us fulfilling our obligations if our heart is not following him. He wants the rituals and offering to be given out of love and devotion for him.

Revelation 2:18-3:6:

  • 20-23 – Some of the church of Thyatira had begun to engage in sins such as adultery and eating foods offered to idols.
  • 24-29 – The vision makes for an allotment for people in the church who had not yet fallen into deep sin. There seems to be great hope for these folks.
  • 1-6 – It is clear that God will not condemn whole people groups when there are still faithful people in the midst. Instead he is separating the faithful from the unfaithful while still giving the unfaithful opportunities to repent.

Psalm 130:1-8:

  • 1-4 – This is another one of the psalms associated with pilgrimages to Jerusalem. It seems important that those Israelites knew that they could be forgiven if they sought God’s forgiveness.

November 6 – Daily Notes – Amanda

not fair

It is in our nature to question things. Often, we question God’s goodness because of things in the world we don’t like. We wonder if God is fair. We often forget that we actually don’t want God to be fair because we would be in a world of hurt if he was. Today’s Psalm reminds us that God is faithful even when we’re sinful. This is the kind of unfair we can really get behind.

Ezekiel 14:12-16:42:

  • 12-23 – God makes it clear that any one of the four acts of destroying an unfaithful city would suffice, but he has committed to all four acts against Jerusalem.
  • 1-8 – The vine is Jerusalem. God makes it clear that Jerusalem will be completely useless and easy to destroy now that it is separated from God.
  • 1-14 – God reminds Jerusalem that it is he who made the city great. It was nothing without him.
  • 15-22 – When they refer to Jerusalem “whoring”, it means that Jerusalem would give itself to any available idol worship or other god that presented itself. Jerusalem was not faithful to God.
  • 30-34 – God explains that Jerusalem’s actions weren’t even as beneficial as a prostitute’s. Even a prostitute gets some reward for her sins.

Hebrews 7:18-28:

  • 18-22 – This is a continuation of yesterday’s comparison between Melchizedek and Jesus. This continues to describe Jesus as superior to Melchizedek.
  • 28 – God still uses sinful people for his purposes, but we still have to look to Jesus, who was perfect, for salvation.

Psalm 106:1-12:

  • 6-12 – This psalm reminds us of God’s faithfulness even in the midst of our failings.

Proverbs 27:4-6:

  • 5 – Open rebuke gives a person an opportunity to self-correct. Hidden love has good intentions but doesn’t actually help the other out.

October 22 – Daily Notes – Amanda

promise

The destruction and terror Jeremiah has been preaching for so long is now impending. This would be terrifying! But God promised to protect Jeremiah and those who had been good to him. So does he? Yes! Of course! Even when things look terrifying, we can trust that God will stay true to his promises. If he’s promised protection, he’ll protect us. If he’s promised healing, we’ll receive healing. We can trust that his promises are true. We see it over and over in Scripture.

Jeremiah 39:1-41:18:

  • 1-10 – The impending destruction of Jerusalem has finally come. The Babylonians, as prophesied, overtake the Israelites.
  • 11-18 – Amidst the destruction, God still takes care of Jeremiah and has King Nebuchadnezzar protect him. God also promises to protect Ebed-melech, the Ethiopian who rescued Jeremiah from the cistern.
  • 1-6 – Jeremiah is given the option of where he wants to be. He chooses to stay in Judah.
  • 1-10 – Ishmael, a member of the royal house of Judah, kills Gedaliah, the governor Babylon had placed over all that remained in Judah. This was a very dangerous act by Ishmael.

2 Timothy 1:1-18:

  • 1-2 – Timothy was a protégé of Paul’s.
  • 6-7 – Faith can be taught to us, like it was to Timothy, but we still have to claim it for ourselves, as Paul is encouraging Timothy to do.
  • 8-14 – Paul teaches Timothy to cherish the faith and testimony he’s been given and to be willing to suffer for it.

Psalm 90:1-91:16:

  • 12-17 – Having already established the power of God, the psalmist asks God to provide for and sustain him and to bless the work that he does.
  • 1-16 – The psalmist encourages others that God will protect them. Even when it looks hopeless and when others around them are being killed, God is in control.

Proverbs 26:1-2:

  • 2 – If a curse is cast but has no cause, it will not come to fruition.

September 16 – Daily Notes – Amanda

family praying

Watching your kid hit his first homerun, win an award, or get an ‘A’ is exciting and exhilarating. But none of these things come close to comparing with watching your child walk faithfully with God. Today’ proverb helps remind us that this is the ultimate success in parenting.

Isaiah 22:1-24:23:

  • 1 – “Valley of vision” refers to Jerusalem. There is irony in this title because Jerusalem had always been referred to as on top of a mountain – which was both physical and figurative.
  • 1-14 – This prophecy is aimed at Judah. God saved them from Assyria’s attacks and they felt they were home-free so they began celebrating instead of mourning their sins like God called them to do.
  • 14-25 – Shebna was an officer for King Hezekiah but his sin was so great that he was demoted. This is an indictment on him.
  • 1-18 – This prophecy is against Tyre and Sidon explaining their impending destruction.
  • 1-23 – This chapter ends the prophecies against various cities and begins an apocalyptic section.

Galatians 2:17-3:9:

  • 20-21 – Some of the most beautiful verses in Scripture that are often misunderstood. This is to say that Paul’s flesh and sinful nature died with Christ on the cross and now Christ’s righteousness should live through him. We don’t get to say we’re saved by Christ and then go on living the same way as before.
  • 1-6 – Paul implores the Galatians to live out their salvation and not to try to be justified by works or to live simply as if they were never saved.

Psalm 60:1-12:

  • This psalm cries out to God because they are being punished for their sins. It ends with the knowledge and understanding that God is powerful, in control, and will certainly restore them.

Proverbs 23:15-16:

  • It is a parent’s greatest joy to see their child walk faithfully.

August 12 – Daily Notes – Amanda

sin

Sin causes separation from God. That is a terrible consequence and should be enough to deter us, but often times, it’s not. Today’s psalm also reminds us that sin has additional consequences. Sin also hurts us and causes us pain and misery. Sounds like we should do our best to avoid it.

Nehemiah 3:15-5:13:

  • 15-32 – This is a continuation of all the people who help repair the walls of Jerusalem. It is powerful to listen to how they all worked one after another to fix section after section of the wall and gates.
  • 7-9 – The strength of a city wall was very important during foreign attacks. The enemies of the Israelites did not like that their walls were getting stronger and thus their city was more protected.
  • 1-13 – The wealthy and powerful were taxing those who had less. Nehemiah made them stop because this was weakening them when they were trying to rebuild their city.

1 Corinthians 7:25-40:

  • 25-35 – Paul had a mindset that Jesus might be coming back tomorrow. He lived his life in a way to be prepared for that. His advice to the unmarried folks of his day was that it would be better and easier for them to stay unmarried instead of being distracted by a marriage relationship.
  • 36-40 – Paul isn’t saying that marriage is bad. He’s just saying people can focus on God better if they stay unmarried.

Psalm 32:1-11:

  • 1-5 – David gives thanks to God for forgiving his sins and in so doing gives instructions on how to seek forgiveness.
  • 10 – Sin is evil against God, but it also makes life more difficult for the sinner.

Proverbs 21:5-7:

  • 5 – The Proverbs encourage us over and over again to think through our actions and decisions and not act hastily.