Jan. 1 – Matthew 1:1-2:12 – Andrew

Matthew 1:1-2:12

1:2-1:17 – The genealogies seem boring to modern readers, but they are important because they show that biblical faith is grounded in history.  The Jews believed that God had actually worked through their ancestors, and the genealogies are a way of indicating that.  Also, there are 4 women mentioned in the genealogy, and all the references are scandalous….  What does that say about Jesus?

Love this version of Matthew’s Begats by Andrew Peterson:

–AF

 

Jan. 1 – Genesis 1:1-2:25 – Andrew

1:12 – Note how everything in the Creation account is specifically ordered, even down to the seeds of the plants “each according to its kind.”

1:27 – Note how male and female together make up humanity, and somehow it is in their complementarity that men and women together bear the image of God.  I think this is important.  A man alone does not sufficiently reflect the image of God, nor a woman alone, but a man and a woman together.  How might gender relations be different if we believed that our counterparts bore the image of God in ways that we don’t?

1:30 – Note how, according to the author of Genesis, the original design was for the animals in nature to be vegetarians.  Having seen wild animals in Africa make a kill, I can understand why “nature red in tooth and claw” is a sign of the Fall.

2:4 – There are actually two Creation stories, back to back.  The 2nd story begins in 2:4 and is much more concerned with the Creation of Adam.

2:10-14 – I wonder if, for the original hearers of this passage, the first 2 rivers meant anything to them.  Today, we have no idea what or where is the Piston or the Gihon.  We do, however, know about the Tigris and the Euphrates.

2:14 – “Assyria.”  I think that suggests that this was written down or edited during a time when the ancient kingdom of Assyria would have meant something to folks.

2:19 – Love that detail–isn’t that exactly what happened?  We have named all of Creation, haven’t we?

2:24-25 – Again, there is something really important going on here.  We live in a world with a lot of gender confusion, but the opening passages of Genesis suggests that there is something about the coming together of a man and a woman that creates oneness, and somehow that relates to the image of God.  (See 1:27, above.)

–AF

 

January 1 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Genesis 1:1-2:25:

  • 2 – First mention of the Holy Spirit being present.
  • 26 – Note the use of “our”. This is God speaking amongst all 3 persons of the Trinity. Humanity is made in the image of God the Trinity. This is why we’re designed to create things, to love, and to be in relationship.
  • 2:1-3 – This is why we are to observe the Sabbath – a day of rest from our regular work.
  • Note that chapter 1 and chapter 2 of Genesis tell the story of the creation of humanity slightly differently.
  • Some people ask why God put the tree of good and evil in the garden if it wasn’t good for people. The better question might be, though, with all the other choices in the garden, why were the people drawn to the one tree that was forbidden.

Matthew 1:1-2:12:

  • The genealogy found in Matthew is that of Joseph, Jesus’ earthly father.
  • 17 – Abraham, David, exile in Babylon, and the Messiah are four of the most significant milestones in Jewish history that any ancient Jew would have understood and recognized.
  • Matthew’s birth account focuses on Joseph while Luke’s birth account focuses on Mary.
  • 6 – This is just one of the many prophecies Matthew notes as being fulfilled through Christ. Make note of all the prophecies fulfilled in this gospel.

Psalm 1:1-6:

  • This Psalm contrasts a person who’s delight is in the law of the Lord versus someone who is wicked.

Proverbs 1:1-6:

  • Consider this short passage as a statement of purpose for why the author wrote the book of Proverbs.

What to Expect – Week 1

Welcome to Munger’s “The Bible Project”! You are brave and wise to begin this year-long project of reading the entire Bible. So, in this first week, here are a few things to think about:

  • The Bible should be read as one huge story (told through a lot of smaller stories, songs, eye-witness accounts, letters, etc.) that tells us how much God loves humanity and the lengths he was and is willing to go to in order to be connected with us.
  • The Old Testament is the story of God trying to keep this connection through one specific family – the Israelites. (This week you’ll read about the events that lead up to that family and, on day 5, meet the patriarch.)
  • The New Testament is the story of Jesus coming to earth to teach us how to live and then to die to save us all. The remainder is the early Christians figuring out how to live as faithful followers of Christ until he returns.
  • Each day you will also read passages from the Psalms and Proverbs. The Psalms are songs and poems written with raw human emotion. Note that anything you’ve felt – joy, rejection, sorrow, elation – are all expressed through the Psalms. Proverbs, on the other hand, are written with the intention of guiding the reader in wisdom. Many actions are contrasted as wise or foolish.

While there is a lot more to know about the Bible, let that be a starting point. Don’t expect to understand everything and if you have questions, ask them. Find a few people to read with so you can discuss your findings and hold each other accountable.

You can do this! And trust us, it will be well worth it!