December 4 – Daily Notes – Amanda

playing mercy

When is the last time you felt completely vulnerable and like you had no control over a situation? In today’s psalm, the psalmist likens the vulnerability of needing to mercy to that of a servant’s position to his master. Vulnerability is difficult for us, but it’s often good for us. We need, at times, to recognize there is nothing we can do to earn or acquire God’s mercy.

Daniel 11:36-12:13:

  • 36-45 – The king of the north will not honor God, but will offer his affections wherever he finds favor. Ultimately, he will die defeated and alone.
  • 1-12 – The man in linen explains what will happen in the end times, but Daniel doesn’t understand. The man in linen tells him that it’s ok, he’s not supposed to.

1 John 4:1-21:

  • 1-6 – This section encourages us to use discernment in who we trust and listen to. It also explains the difference and reminds us that the Spirit of God is greater than the spirits of the world.
  • 7-12 – The love we have for one another is love from God. God loved us first which then shows us how to love others.
  • 18 – This is how we can decipher what is true love – it does not operate on fear.

Psalm 123:1-4:

  • 1-2 – This is an act of total submission. Just as a servant looks to its master, so the psalmist is looking to God for mercy despite his sins.

Proverbs 29:2-4:

  • 2 – The righteous treat people well, but the wicked are hard on the people.

November 27 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Because one time isn’t enough to hear this song, enjoy the musical version of a portion of today’s psalm:

Daniel 4:1-37:

  • 1-3 – Remember, Nebuchadnezzar turned his allegiance to God after witnessing the miracle of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego not burning up in the fire.
  • 4-27 – The king calls on Daniel to interpret his dream and it’s not favorable. Daniel must have been understandably scared to deliver the bad news to the king.
  • 28-37 – Nebuchadnezzar still takes credit for the power of Babylon, which destroyed Israel and captured their people. God humbles him and reminds him who is truly in control.

2 Peter 1:1-21:

  • 3-4 – God gives us insight into faithful living and what he wants from us for our own good and so we can follow him.
  • 19-21 – This confirms that prophecies were given by God through the Holy Spirit. At this point, many prophecies had come true, but this was encouragement to continue to trust those that hadn’t.

Psalm 119:97-112:

  • 97-104 – The psalmist continues to show great love for God’s commands. He realizes that this is where he can receive wisdom and protection.
  • 105 – A familiar and beautiful verse proclaiming the great help Scripture can give us.

Proverbs 28:17-18:

  • 17 – Guilt of this kind of sin cannot be taken away.

November 1 – Daily Notes – Amanda

guardrail

Do you remember learning, in elementary school, that it takes more muscles to frown than to smile? It is kind of surprising that we have to make special effort to frown. This is kind of like when we think about what Hebrews tells us today – it is easier to stray from God’s path than to remain faithful. Shouldn’t it be easier to remain faithful? Unfortunately, there are a lot of outside forces pulling us away from faithfulness. This is why we need to surround ourselves with other faithful folks to help bounce us back on the righteous path.

Ezekiel 1:1-3:15:

  • 1-3 – This gives the context of Ezekiel’s visions from God, which he is now prophesying.
  • 4-28 – This sets the scene of what Ezekiel sees as he receives his visions. The creatures, wheels, and dome, all play a part in showing God’s majesty as he speaks to Ezekiel.
  • 2 – Ezekiel, more than any other prophet, makes the Spirit an emphasis.
  • 2:8-3:3 – Ezekiel is twice instructed to eat a scroll. This is, in effect, asking him to fill himself with the word of God.
  • 12-15 – God’s wind takes Ezekiel from the sweetness of ingesting God’s scrolls back to the stark contrast of the harsh reality of the exiles. Ezekiel becomes bitter.

Hebrews 3:1-19:

  • 1-6 – Moses, like David and Elijah, was highly revered for his acts of faithfulness by Jewish people. The author, here, is explaining that as great Moses was, Jesus is higher.
  • 12-15 – It is harder to live faithfully than it is to fall away because temptation and complacency are constantly pulling us away from faithfulness. This encourages us to help each other stay faithful.
  • 16-19 – The author encourages the believers to learn from the Israelites wandering in the desert’s mistakes.

Psalm 104:1-23:

  • This psalm offers a series of the many ways God provides for his creation. Each is so thoughtful and intricate.

Proverbs 26:24-26:

  • 24-26 – Hate in our heart can be masked by kind sounding words, but will eventually shine through.

October 1 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Isaiah's calling

As we wrap up Isaiah, it is incredible to think back on the month or so it has taken us to get through this powerful book. Isaiah rejects and then accepts his call, preaches destruction and exile for the Israelites, preaches eventual restoration for the Israelites, and sprinkles little hints of what to look for in a Messiah throughout. And while it is, at times, a difficult book to trudge through, A) you did it! and B) it offers both immediate and eternal hope.

Isaiah 62:6-65:25:

  • 6-12 – God continues to paint the picture of Jerusalem’s coming salvation. He speaks of preparations for that day and makes promises that the Israelites will no longer be defeated.
  • 1-6 – God speaks of how he took vengeance on his enemies.
  • 7-19 – The speaker changes to someone who is remembering how merciful God has been and then asking for more of that mercy.
  • 1-12 – They continue to ask to see God’s power in saving them and bringing them out of trouble.
  • 1-16 – God juxtaposes the treatment of his servants with that of those who choose not to serve him. God’s servants will receive great blessing while the others will receive great pain.

Philippians 2:19-3:4a:

  • 19-24 – Timothy was a young man Paul had taken under his wing. Paul commissioned him to spread the gospel as well.
  • 2-4 – Once again Paul explains that living by the Spirit is far more necessary than circumcision. He reminds his readers that he, as a Jew, is circumcised so he can say this out of truth and not jealousy.

Psalm 73:1-28

  • The entire psalm, but with a crescendo in verses 25-26, are attesting to the confidence the psalmist has in God as his hope, salvation, and protection.

Proverbs 24:13-14:

  • This portion makes a very tangible comparison of how wisdom benefits us.

September 20 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Today we learn the Fruit of the Spirit! This is the great stuff we produce when we’re living by the Spirit. Here’s a very annoying song to help you remember what you’re intended to produce:

Isaiah 33:13-36:22:

  • 13-22 – God continues to reassure Judah that they don’t have to fear Assyria but that he will restore the righteous of their land.
  • 1-14 – The prophecies continue to look to the future when all enemies of God’s people are taken care of.
  • 1-22 – Assyria attacks Jerusalem. King Hezekiah has confidence that God will prevail and the Israelites will be saved from the hands of the Assyrians.

Galatians 5:13-26:

  • 13-15 – Just because we are not under the law anymore does not mean our lives are meant to be a free for all. Our freedom in Christ should lead us to become more like Christ. One way we can do that is to love our neighbors as ourselves.
  • 22-23 – The “fruit of the Spirit” are the things that our lives should produce when we are living through the Spirit. Paul states that neither Jews nor Gentiles would have laws against someone producing these wonderful things.

Psalm 64:1-10:

  • Like in many of his psalms, David longs for God, who he relies on for protection and sustenance, to punish all his enemies and all those who do not follow God. He has such confidence in God to do so.

September 18 – Daily Notes – Amanda

go-through-motions

Today’s Isaiah reading talks about folks who play the part and go through the motions but don’t actually live faithfully or love God fully. This is still an issue in churches today. We show up and perform faithful looking acts, but have no intention of allowing ourselves to be transformed into the likeness of Christ.

Isaiah 28:14-30:11:

  • 16-18 – Here Isaiah refers to a cornerstone. Some believe that this is a Messianic prophecy like when Jesus is referred to as the cornerstone on which others will break themselves.
  • 23-29 – Just as the farmer knows the proper ways to care for his crops, God knows the proper ways to care for his people.
  • 9-12 – The Holy Spirit reveals more of God to those who believe.
  • 13-16 – Many people claimed to love and follow God, they even participated in many of the rituals, but their hearts and actions were not faithful.
  • 22-24 – God foretells a time when the Israelites will return to faithfulness.

Galatians 3:23-4:31:

  • 23-29 – People, as we still do today, were constantly looking for what separated them or made them better or more worthy. Paul makes it clear that once you have been baptized into the faith, we are all equal in the sight of the Lord and heirs to God’s inheritance.
  • 4-7 – Jesus’ being a Jew and being born under the law gave him legitimacy to the Jews.

Psalm 62:1-12:

  • 1-7 – David repeats himself regarding his trust in who God is and how he offers great protection. It might be helpful sometimes to repeat to ourselves reasons why we trust in God.

Proverbs 23:19-21:

  • Solomon did not advocate laziness.

August 30 – Daily Notes – Amanda

give me

I have come to hate the word “deserve”. It wreaks of entitlement and, honestly, what do we actually deserve? In today’s Job reading, Job is trying to rebut Elihu. Job argues that just because we live righteously, we are not guaranteed blessings. We live righteously because that’s what we’re called to do. We don’t, then, deserve a reward for doing so.

Job 34:1-36:33:

  • 1-37 – Elihu continues to assert, like Job’s friends, that God cannot do anything unjust. He also contrasts Job with someone who repents suggesting that Job has not and needs to. They continue to assume that Job has sinned to cause all this destruction.
  • 1-16 – Elihu continues to argue with Job and correct him for saying that righteousness doesn’t earn a reward from God.
  • 1-33 – Though Elihu, for the most part sings praise to God for his greatness, he also calls himself “perfect in knowledge”, which seems to equate himself with at least the knowledge of God. This seems counter to the majority of his thoughts.

2 Corinthians 4:1-12:

  • 5 – This is something we must make sure we are doing. We are not trying to bring glory to ourselves or promote ourselves as saviors, but to share Christ with the nations.
  • 7 – We are the jars of clay. Jars of clay are fragile and hold the thing that is important. We have the Holy Spirit inside us.
  • 8-12 – Though Paul and his companions had received a lot of persecution and difficulty, they were still able to share the gospel. Nothing had been able to destroy them.

Psalm 44:1-8:

  • 1-3 – These three verses explain the importance of sharing our faith with younger generations. The Sons of Korah believed in God’s power and provision because their fathers told them how he had displayed it.

Proverbs 22:10-12:

  • 11-12 – Kindness and graciousness will always gain you favor, while hateful words are eventually found out.

August 29 – Daily Notes – Amanda

turn away

In today’s Job reading, Elihu encourages Job to repent, but Job feels that he has nothing to repent of. Though Job may have been right, the conversation brings up a good point: we all require repentance. Repentance is hard because it means turning away from sin and sin is often enticing. So, if I may briefly play the role of Elihu, is there something you need to repent of today?

Job 31:1-33:33:

  • 1-40 – Job makes a case for his high moral standards. He seems to be willing to accept his plight as punishment if sin can be found in him.
  • 2 – Elihu is a new character and an Israelite.
  • 6 – Age, experience, and establishment were highly revered in their culture. They saw the elderly as wise. We tend to see them as having lost their edge.
  • 1-33 – Elihu tries to relate to Job so that Job will listen to him and then explains that God is continually trying to steer people away from sin. Elihu also suggests that Job’s experience may have been God giving him an opportunity for repentance.

2 Corinthians 3:1-18:

  • 1-3 – This is to say that the faithful Corinthians were proof of Paul and his companions’ efforts to share Christ with the nations.
  • 4-6 – “The letter” refers to the law. It led to death because people could not follow it and remain righteous while the Spirit is given to us upon salvation and thus gives life.
  • 16-18 – The Spirit brings freedom from sin and death.

Psalm 43:1-5:

  • 3 – This is actually a pretty bold request, because if God sends his light and truth to lead you, then that’s what you have to follow. We aren’t always willing to make that commitment.

Proverbs 22:8-9:

  • These verses give the consequences of the actions mentioned in yesterday’s proverb and then offers an alternate option.

August 22 – Daily Notes – Amanda

confusion

Speaking in tongues is one of those things that people use as an example of why Christianity is weird. Many Christians are even totally turned off by it. Speaking in tongues is a gift of the Spirit, so it, in and of itself, is a good thing. The discomfort is often because we are simply not familiar with speaking in tongues or that gift is being used incorrectly. Paul goes to great lengths in our 1 Corinthians reading to explain how and when this special gift should be used. Hopefully this will clear up a little confusion and assuage some fear.

Job 4:1-7:21:

  • 4:1-5:27 – Job’s friend, Eliphaz, suggests that it is Job’s sin that has brought his troubles about. While sin does bring on some of our afflictions, ancient cultures believed that all infirmities and difficulties (i.e. blindness or paralysis) were brought on by the sin of you or your parents.
  • 6:1-7:21 – Job’s response asks to be shown whatever sin he has. He ends by asking God why he won’t take the pain and torment off of him.

1 Corinthians 14:18-40:

  • 18 – Paul says this to explain that he’s not jealous of the Corinthians for being able to speak in tongues, because he can too. Paul spends a good amount of time explaining the proper use of tongues. Clearly the Corinthians were using them incorrectly.
  • 20 – A good contrast. Be young in your knowledge and experience of evil. Be wise and mature in your thought.
  • 22- This simply means that tongues gain the attention of unbelievers while prophecy serves that purpose for believers.
  • 26-33 – Paul is trying to teach the Corinthians how to appropriately use their gifts so they can build up the body instead of confuse it.

Psalm 37:30-40:

  • 31 – When the law of God is on our heart, it is considerably easier to follow it.

Proverbs 21:27:

  • Proverbs says similar things in 15:8 and 15:29. Sacrifices from the wicked are not given with the heart that they are intended.

August 21 – Daily Notes – Amanda

 

Job is a tough book to read for a number of reasons, but there are a number of takeaways. One major one is in today’s reading. Job reminds us that the Lord gives and thus it is God’s right to take those things away as well. He confirms, though that either way, whether in blessing or wanting, the name of the Lord should be blessed. Here’s a musical version of the same concept:

Job 1:1-3:26:

  • 1 – “Blameless and upright” is a description very few people in the Bible receive. Noah, before the flood, was described in a similar way.
  • 5 – Job even hedged his bets by sacrificing for his children just in case they were sinful without his knowledge.
  • 6-12 – Satan challenged God saying that Job was only faithful because God had, until then, protected him and all his things. God disagrees and allows him to torment Job in order to prove his faithfulness.
  • 20-22 – After all the turmoil and trauma Job received back to back to back, he grieved but did not curse God like Satan said he would.
  • 3-6 – This time God allows Satan to strike Job with any kind of personal illness as long as he doesn’t kill him.
  • 9 – This must be what Proverbs warns against when it talks about basically anything being better than living with a quarrelsome wife.
  • 10 – It is obviously much easier to receive the good God gives us, but Job reminds us that we can’t expect the good without being willing to receive bad too.
  • 3-26 – Job basically wishes he was never born.

1 Corinthians 14:1-17:

  • 5 – Speaking in tongues, unless it is interpreted for the body, is intended to be between that person and God.
  • 16-17 – Speaking in ways others can understand is important in the larger body. Paul gives the example that it then allows someone to say “amen” in agreement with what you’ve said. They can only do that if they understood what was said.

Psalm 37:12-29:

  • 14-17 – These verses basically explain that wicked people and the Lord are at war over the poor and needy. The wicked try to take them down while the Lord makes sure to lift them up.
  • 23-24 – Even though we stumble and struggle at times, if we are faithful, the Lord keeps us from total destruction.

Proverbs 21:25-26:

  • 26 – What a powerful verse! When we are lazy and sloth-y, we tend to constantly want and need. The righteous, on the other hand, are willing to give and give abundantly.