August 22 – Daily Notes – Amanda

confusion

Speaking in tongues is one of those things that people use as an example of why Christianity is weird. Many Christians are even totally turned off by it. Speaking in tongues is a gift of the Spirit, so it, in and of itself, is a good thing. The discomfort is often because we are simply not familiar with speaking in tongues or that gift is being used incorrectly. Paul goes to great lengths in our 1 Corinthians reading to explain how and when this special gift should be used. Hopefully this will clear up a little confusion and assuage some fear.

Job 4:1-7:21:

  • 4:1-5:27 – Job’s friend, Eliphaz, suggests that it is Job’s sin that has brought his troubles about. While sin does bring on some of our afflictions, ancient cultures believed that all infirmities and difficulties (i.e. blindness or paralysis) were brought on by the sin of you or your parents.
  • 6:1-7:21 – Job’s response asks to be shown whatever sin he has. He ends by asking God why he won’t take the pain and torment off of him.

1 Corinthians 14:18-40:

  • 18 – Paul says this to explain that he’s not jealous of the Corinthians for being able to speak in tongues, because he can too. Paul spends a good amount of time explaining the proper use of tongues. Clearly the Corinthians were using them incorrectly.
  • 20 – A good contrast. Be young in your knowledge and experience of evil. Be wise and mature in your thought.
  • 22- This simply means that tongues gain the attention of unbelievers while prophecy serves that purpose for believers.
  • 26-33 – Paul is trying to teach the Corinthians how to appropriately use their gifts so they can build up the body instead of confuse it.

Psalm 37:30-40:

  • 31 – When the law of God is on our heart, it is considerably easier to follow it.

Proverbs 21:27:

  • Proverbs says similar things in 15:8 and 15:29. Sacrifices from the wicked are not given with the heart that they are intended.

August 21 – Daily Notes – Amanda

 

Job is a tough book to read for a number of reasons, but there are a number of takeaways. One major one is in today’s reading. Job reminds us that the Lord gives and thus it is God’s right to take those things away as well. He confirms, though that either way, whether in blessing or wanting, the name of the Lord should be blessed. Here’s a musical version of the same concept:

Job 1:1-3:26:

  • 1 – “Blameless and upright” is a description very few people in the Bible receive. Noah, before the flood, was described in a similar way.
  • 5 – Job even hedged his bets by sacrificing for his children just in case they were sinful without his knowledge.
  • 6-12 – Satan challenged God saying that Job was only faithful because God had, until then, protected him and all his things. God disagrees and allows him to torment Job in order to prove his faithfulness.
  • 20-22 – After all the turmoil and trauma Job received back to back to back, he grieved but did not curse God like Satan said he would.
  • 3-6 – This time God allows Satan to strike Job with any kind of personal illness as long as he doesn’t kill him.
  • 9 – This must be what Proverbs warns against when it talks about basically anything being better than living with a quarrelsome wife.
  • 10 – It is obviously much easier to receive the good God gives us, but Job reminds us that we can’t expect the good without being willing to receive bad too.
  • 3-26 – Job basically wishes he was never born.

1 Corinthians 14:1-17:

  • 5 – Speaking in tongues, unless it is interpreted for the body, is intended to be between that person and God.
  • 16-17 – Speaking in ways others can understand is important in the larger body. Paul gives the example that it then allows someone to say “amen” in agreement with what you’ve said. They can only do that if they understood what was said.

Psalm 37:12-29:

  • 14-17 – These verses basically explain that wicked people and the Lord are at war over the poor and needy. The wicked try to take them down while the Lord makes sure to lift them up.
  • 23-24 – Even though we stumble and struggle at times, if we are faithful, the Lord keeps us from total destruction.

Proverbs 21:25-26:

  • 26 – What a powerful verse! When we are lazy and sloth-y, we tend to constantly want and need. The righteous, on the other hand, are willing to give and give abundantly.

August 19 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Gifts

Yesterday we talked about how God can use any gift he’s given us, using Esther’s beauty as an example. Today, in 1 Corinthians, we look at gifts of the Spirit. These are gifts specifically designed to build up the body of Christ. If you haven’t done a Spiritual Gifts Inventory to figure out your specific gifts, here’s one. Take a few minutes to explore the gifts God has given you.

Esther 4:1-7:10:

  • 1-3 – Sackcloth and ashes were signs of mourning.
  • 4-9 – Esther was distressed by Mordecai’s actions and the fact that he was mourning. She still did not know about the decree to destroy the Jews. Mordecai sent the news through Hathach, the eunuch.
  • 11-17 – In order to talk to the king about the decree, Esther had to break the law and risk her life. The king would be well within his rights to have her killed when she approached him.
  • 14 – A powerful statement from Mordecai that Esther may have been put in her unique position for this specific purpose.
  • 10-11 – Haman must have been fuming as he had to honor the man that he was hoping to have killed.

1 Corinthians 12:1-26:

  • 3 – This is to say that the Spirit of God cannot speak against Jesus so if we truly have the Spirit within us, we cannot speak against Jesus.
  • 4-11 – We are all given different gifts from the Spirit and these gifts are intended for the building up of the body of Christ.
  • 12-20 – All our gifts are meant to work together for the good of the group. We shouldn’t feel bad or be jealous that we don’t have certain gifts. Instead we should use our gift to our best ability in order to benefit the whole.

Psalm 36:1-12:

  • 5-9 – These verses explain what all the Lord offers to us. There are vast benefits to loving and serving God. The verses before this, however, profile those who do not honor and love God.

August 7 – Daily Notes – Amanda

bumper lanes

Obedience is a tricky thing. We often want to obey partially, but that is actually not obedience. The good news is, as our proverb tells us today, we have the Holy Spirit to act a little like bumpers on a bowling lane when our obedience starts to slip. Thank goodness for all the checks and balances God has put in place for us.

Ezra 5:1-6:22:

  • 6-17 – King Cyrus had approved the rebuilding of the temple in Jerusalem, but King Artaxerxes, his predecessor had halted the progress. Now the leaders trying to get it built again were appealing to Darius to allow them to search for the gold and silver vessels used in worship in the original temple.
  • 6-12 – King Darius makes a decree putting all the building plans back in progress.
  • 16-22 – It would have been a huge celebration for the Israelites to return to their land, dedicate the temple, and celebrate Passover again. It is hard for us to relate to how significant that would have been for them.

1 Corinthians 3:5-23:

  • 5-9 – This is great encouragement for people investing in the faith growth of the next generation or anyone really. We are called to be faithful in giving them the information they need. God is responsible for growing it and making it flourish.
  • 16-17 – It matters how we treat the dwelling place of the Lord. This is both true of our physical bodies as well as our holistic health.

Psalm 29:1-11:

  • We are quick to minimize the power and majesty of God. We look to other things in our lives, or even ourselves, to do the work of God. This psalm reminds us of the power of God and how he should be praised for it.

Proverbs 20:26-27:

  • 27 – It is the Spirit’s job to test our hearts and help convict us in the places where we are not obeying God.

August 6 – Daily Notes – Amanda

thank you advance

Do you ever thank God for something before it happens? This takes a great deal of trust to do it genuinely. It means that you truly believe that God will fulfill your need. This is how today’s psalm is written. A requested is made and, presumably, before the prayer is answered, David thanks God for answering it.

Ezra 3:1-4:24:

  • 2 – Zerubbabel and Shealtiel were both in Jesus’ genealogy in Matthew.
  • 8 – The Levite men were in charge of overseeing the construction of the temple, but considering how long they had been in captivity, some of them would have never seen the original temple.
  • 11 – We see this sentence used in praise over and over, particularly in the Psalms.
  • 1-3 – Zerubbabel and Jeshua knew that they were intended to be set apart. We don’t know what the adversaries intended to do, but they aren’t allowed to be a part of the temple build.
  • 7-16 – Artaxerxes succeeded Cyrus as king of Persia. Some of his advisors discouraged him from allowing the Israelites to leave exile and return to and rebuild Jerusalem.
  • 17-24 – Artaxerxes halts the rebuild of the temple. This must have been a devastating blow to the Israelites who were trying to reestablish their identity.

1 Corinthians 2:6-3:4:

  • 11-13 – The Spirit is our advisor on the things of God. The Spirit gives us insight into how God is leading us and what he would have us do.
  • 1-4 – Paul is calling out the Corinthians for not having matured spiritually. There are many things he had not taught them because they were not ready for it.

Psalm 28:1-9:

  • This Psalm is split into two parts. Verses 1-5 are asking God for help, while 6-9 are thanking God for the help. It is most likely that David is thanking God in advance and simply believing that God will take care of the problem.

Proverbs 20:24-25:

  • 24 – This is a very intriguing question. It is basically that God guides our paths and leads us to where we need to go. If he is capable of that, who are we to expect to understand why or how he does it?

June 12 – Daily Notes – Amanda

good news

Have you ever been scared to share your faith? You didn’t want to offend someone or thought they might not be open to it? In today’s Acts reading, Stephen gives us a great example of how evangelism should go. The Holy Spirit gives us an opportunity – we’re put in the right position or feel an urge to say something – and then we should just go for it. When we think about it as good news, which it is, it gets a whole lot easier.

1 Kings 9:1-10:29:

  • 1-9 – God makes it clear what he requires of Solomon and his line and the consequences if they disobey.
  • This section is intended to show the vast wealth and resources that Solomon had. Clearly this was a time of plenty for Israel. Solomon and his relationship with God were responsible for it.

Acts 8:14-40:

  • 14-17 – It seems odd that the Samaritans received Christ and chose to be baptized but weren’t able to have the Holy Spirit until the apostles came.
  • 26-38 – Philip was led into a clear evangelism opportunity by listening to the Spirit. We often wonder if we are supposed to share our faith or not in certain situations, but if we trust the Spirit to guide us, it will become clear.

Psalm 130:1-8:

  • 3-4 – Our sins make us unworthy of connection with God, but he does not count them against us because of his grace.

Proverbs 17:2-3:

  • Throughout Scripture there is a theme of birthright and status not guaranteeing that you receive that is due to you. God does not judge as we judge, he looks at the heart.

June 4 – Daily Notes – Amanda

preaching

Can you imagine if 3,000 people came to faith from a sermon today? That would be incredible!! Peter’s explanation of Jesus as the Messiah was convincing enough to help tons of people put their faith in Christ. And just think, this is way before any type of mass communication or even microphones. The good news was that powerful then and it still is today!

2 Samuel 22:21-23:23:

  • 21-7 – David’s song of praise to God continues from yesterday’s reading.
  • 25-27 – David portrays God’s reactions as equivalent to the actions of the human. Good behavior receives favor. Poor behavior receives punishment.
  • 1-7 – These were not David’s last words before death but the last of that song. We see that later he asks for a drink.
  • 14-17 – Bethlehem was David’s hometown so he wanted something from home. His request caused people to break through the camp and apparently blood was shed. David was not pleased at the consequences of his request.

Acts 2:1-47:

  • 1-4 – At the end of the gospels, Jesus tells the disciples he is going away but will send a Helper who is even better than him. The entrance of the Holy Spirit is the fulfillment of that promise.
  • 17-21 – Peter interprets the prophecy from Joel correctly. Now that the Holy Spirit is present, the disciples began to see even more miracles and powerful conversions.
  • 22-36 – Peter speaks directly to Israelites who did not believe in Jesus but who revered David. David was a national hero and all the connections the Messiah was supposed to have to David were fulfilled in Jesus.
  • 37-41 – About 3,000 of the Israelites confessed Christ as Savior and were baptized. Whether they were convinced by the resurrection, guidance of the Holy Spirit, or proven connection to David doesn’t matter. They’re conversions are a testament to the lengths to which God will go to be in connection with humanity.
  • 42-47 – These new believers became the first Christian church. These verses are often used as a basis for how we should run churches today.

Psalm 122:1-9:

  • This psalm is written for Jews making their pilgrimage to the temple in Jerusalem for one of the three annual festivals (Passover, The Feast of Weeks, The Feast of Booths) that required being at the temple.

Proverbs 16:19-20:

  • 20 – Yay! That’s us!!