December 17 – Daily Notes – Amanda

peephole

In today’s reading, we get a broad view of God’s character. We see a good amount of his wrath, which we have to remember is brought on by human sin. We also see his continual love and his abundant provision for us. It is easy to get a limited view of God based on what we hear, but reading Scripture opens our eyes to the fullness of who God is.

Nahum 1:1-3:19:

  • 1 – Nineveh was the gentile city Jonah was sent to about 150 years before this prophecy was established. Jonah’s message allowed Nineveh to repent, but apparently they fell back into oppressive, evil ways. Nahum’s message is once again that Nineveh needs to be destroyed.
  • 2-11 – This establishes that God will take care of those who are evil with his wrath and power. The explanation is sure to show, though, that God does not jump to conclusions, but definitely takes care of sin.
  • 15 – Nahum’s name means comfort, but he is preaching a message of destruction. The message would have been comforting to those, like Judah, who Nineveh had oppressed.
  • 1-12 – God declares destruction upon Nineveh.
  • 1-19 – God’s destruction upon Nineveh is promised to bring them low. Other examples of nations God has destroyed are given to compare what their lot will be like.

Revelation 8:1-13:

  • 7-12 – The wrath of God is unleashed after the seventh seal is broken. As the angels blow their trumpets God’s wrath is unleashed in stages.
  • 13 – The eagle warns that the wrath is about to increase.

Psalm 136:1-26:

  • This psalm lists off a series of reasons why God has been good to the people and proven his goodness and then responds by affirming that God’s constant love will endure.

Proverbs 30:7-9:

  • 7-9 – These are beautiful requests asking God to give exactly what is needed, no more and no less.

December 3 – Daily Notes – Amanda

transformation

Salvation is a free gift, not a free pass. We are not offered salvation so we can keep sinning and not have to worry about it. Today’s 1 John reading reminds us that salvation is actually intended to transform us and shape us more into the likeness of Christ so we don’t keep on sinning.

Daniel 11:2-35:

  • 2-35 – This section describes the struggle between the northern king and the southern king. It is describing a time that is to come, not one that has passed. Daniel has a great deal of prophecies that have come to pass and also some that we’re still waiting on.

1 John 3:7-24:

  • 3 – “Little children” is how God is referring to us, his children. Not necessarily to children as defined by age
  • 16-18 – Jesus didn’t just talk about loving us, he showed us by dying for us on the cross. If we simply say we love our neighbors, our words are worthless. We must show it with our actions.
  • 19-24 – Salvation through grace does not exempt us from following God with our lives. We are still to follow his commands and live according to his will – actually even more so because of the gift of salvation.

Psalm 122:1-9:

  • 1-9 – Imagine the Israelites marching up to Jerusalem during one of the appointed festivals singing these words. To us, these are just words in the Bible, but to them, these words were part of their rituals.

Proverbs 29:1:

  • 1 – When we don’t listen to correction, we are doomed to destruction.

What to Expect – Week 49

toilets

We are in the final month of our year of reading the Bible! You can practically see the finish line!! It’s within reach. Keep pushing!

This week, we get to spend some time in the John(s)…sorry for the potty humor. We’ll work through 1st, 2nd, and 3rd John. These are three short letters likely written by the author of the gospel of John.

Some highlights from the Johns are an emphasis on having sound doctrine within Christianity, a reminder for unity within the church, and the significance of Christ’s incarnation to our salvation.

One particular highlight in 1 John is the thesis of the “why” of how we’re called to live. “We love because he first loved us” (1 John 4:19). Love for others can be hard, especially when they seem undeserving, but if we fall back on this simple verse, we’re empowered to love simply because we were first loved.

We still have a lot of good stuff to read, so push through these last days of the plan. It will be well worth it.

August 20 – Daily Notes – Amanda

narrow escape

Though Esther is a unique book, it’s understandable why it was included in Scripture. The Jews narrowly escaped total extinction by an evil man and a weasel king. Purim is still celebrated by Jews today as they remember God’s incredible provision and creativity in assuring that they were not wiped out.

Esther 8:1-10:3:

  • 10 – The Jews choosing not to plunder their enemies is supposed to be a sign that this was a holy war.
  • 23-28 – Purim is a Jewish holiday still observed to this day. It is one of their most joyous occasions as they celebrate avoiding extermination at the hands of Haman.

1 Corinthians 12:27-13:13:

  • 1-13 – Known as “the love chapter”, 1 Corinthians 13 is popular at weddings. It is actually helpful in all walks of life when thinking about what it means to love. If you want to know if you’re being loving or if someone is showing you love, place it up against these requirements.

Psalm 37:1-11:

  • 1 – We do tend to envy wrongdoers because it often seems they get good things easily and are able to take shortcuts. We want their ease of success and don’t always recognize that that success is often short-lived and always dishonoring to God.
  • David continually encourages the hearer of this psalm not to worry about those who are unfaithful and to focus on waiting on the Lord.

Proverbs 21:23-24:

  • 23 – Our mouths tend to get us into trouble. It is wise to watch our words and think through them carefully.

June 27 – Daily Notes – Amanda

advice

Today in both 2 Kings and Proverbs we learn to follow good advice. We are bombarded with all kinds of messages every day of what we simply must do and what is totally absurd to do. Most of these are simply trying to get us to buy something. It is important that we discern those who have our best interest in mind and are steering us in the right direction. Then, like Joash, we need to follow it.

2 Kings 10:32-12:21:

  • 12 – Though Athaliah was ruling in Judah, Joash was the rightful king. When he was 7, he was crowned king by Jehoiada the priest.
  • 2-3 – Joash is considered a faithful king. Thankfully he had a great advisor, Jehoiada, the priest. The “high places” listed here were places of worship to God, not other gods, that is why it was good that they were kept.
  • 4-8 – Joash institutes a plan to repair the temple. The priests don’t comply and then somehow reach a compromise to no longer take people’s money and also not to repair the temple.
  • 21 – Now Joash is killed and his son Amaziah takes over.

Acts 18:1-22:

  • 5-6 – It is common throughout Jesus’ and Paul’s ministries that they try to share the gospel with the Jews but when rejected they offer the same message to the gentiles.
  • 7-11 – The faithfulness and hospitality of Titius and Crispus allow Paul to stay and minister in Corinth for a year and a half.
  • 12 – Macedonia was the northern part of Greece. Achaia was the southern part. Corinth was located in Achaia.
  • 14-15 – Like with Jesus, the Jews bring their complaints to the state official.
  • 17 – Sosthenes was the chief ruler of the Corinthian synagogue.

Psalm 145:1-21:

  • 8 – God’s steadfast, or unchanging, love is a theme throughout the psalms.
  • 9-10 – There is no need to doubt that God wants to and plans to be merciful to all of us. We know this full well because of our salvation. Because of that abundant mercy, we should give continual thanks to God.

Proverbs 18:1:

  • Considering what we just read about Joash’s success as a faithful king because he listened to the wise counsel of Jehoiada, this seems pretty accurate.

June 18 – Daily Notes – Amanda

This link is in the notes as well, but seriously, if you’d like Amy Grant to tell you today’s main Acts story, do yourself a favor and watch this video:

1 Kings 19:1-21:

  • 8 – Moses, Jesus, and now Elijah have all experienced 40 day fasts. Notice that each of them have just experienced or are simultaneously experiencing the power and glory of God. Jesus had just been baptized and received the Holy Spirit, Moses was on the mountain with God, and Elijah had just seen God consume a bull with fire.
  • 11-12 – Often we miss God’s voice and what he’s calling us to do because we’re distracted by the chaos and the big shows. At times, we must be quiet and still to hear him in the whisper.
  • 14-18 – Elijah felt very alone in his faithfulness to God and even feared for his life. God made it clear that he was not alone, but that God would take care of those who had been faithful while punishing those who had not.
  • 19 – Elijah putting his cloak on Elisha symbolizes a transfer of power.
  • 20-21 – Elijah’s response is unclear, but Elisha takes care of a few final things and then begins his life working with and learning from Elijah.

Acts 12:1-23:

  • 3 – Passover was also when Jesus was arrested and killed.
  • 6-11 – A thrilling, 80’s, musical rendition of this story: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNIO9KH3UC8.
  • 12-17 – They assumed that Peter would die in prison and were not expecting to see him.

Psalm 136:1-26:

  • We are to love God because of his great love for us. All the things he does for us, because of his love, are icing on the cake.

Proverbs 17:14-15:

  • 15 – Condoning evil and persecuting good are both equally detestable to God.