June 22 – Daily Notes – Amanda

good God

It’s important to read the Bible carefully. If only skimming, stories like the one of the King of Moab sacrificing his son, in today’s Acts reading, could be mistaken for something God wanted or chose. God did not want the king to sacrifice his son. God did not ask him to do that. That was the king’s own evil choice. We tend to read the Bible as if everything is telling us to “go and do likewise”. This is simply not the case.

2 Kings 3:1-4:17:

  • 9 – The kingdoms of Israel and Judah had not been united on anything since just after Solomon’s reign.
  • 13 – Elisha learned his sass from Elijah. The king of Israel’s parents worshipped Baal. Elisha is pointing out that the king wants the Lord’s help even though he hasn’t been faithful to the Lord.
  • 17-19 – It is often the simplest things that prove God’s favor or lack there of. Like when wandering in the desert, the Israelites lack water and God provides it.
  • 27 – The King of Moab who sacrificed his son did not do this to honor God. God did not ask this of him.
  • 1-7 – The Lord provided for the woman when it seemed impossible. He multiplied the oil to make it profitable for her so she could take care of herself and her son.
  • 8-10 – Above and beyond hospitality
  • 11-17 – Elisha was blessed and then asked the Lord to bless the woman in return.

Acts 14:8-28:

  • 8-10 – Healings often happened because of faith. This one is simply because Paul saw faith in the crippled man.
  • 11-18 – The people assumed that Paul and Barnabas were their gods in human form. This, for obvious reasons, greatly distressed the men of God.
  • 19-23 – When Paul later writes about suffering for the sake of Christ, he is not speaking figuratively. He truly had suffered greatly to share the gospel.

Psalm 140:1-3:

  • It is pretty incredible that, with so many aggressive enemies, David is still able to focus on and remain faithful to God. At the same time, it is pretty incredible how well God protected David from his enemies.

Proverbs 17:22:

  • Joy, a fruit of the spirit, is more than just enjoyable, it’s life giving.

June 21 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Psalm 139 is a powerful one about how intimately God knows us and how purposefully he made each one of us. It is futile to attempt to run from him and why would we want to? He knew us before we were born and loved us before our parents knew we were on our way. Here is a modern interpretation of the psalm:

2 Kings 1:1-2:25:

  • 2 – Reminder: Ahaziah is the king of Judah. It is obviously not good that he’s seeking advice from Baal-zebub.
  • 3 – A little sass from Elijah – clearly God was present, but Ahaziah chooses to consult other gods.
  • 8 – This is very similar to the outfit John the Baptist was described to have worn. John the Baptist was considered the second Elijah.
  • 9-16 – The first two captains with soldiers the king sent were most likely intending to do Elijah harm, this is why he wants to have them killed. The third captain and soldiers come more peacefully.
  • 8 – Very reminiscent of Moses parting the Red Sea.
  • 11-12 – Elijah is the second person in the Old Testament who doesn’t die. Enoch was the first who was simply taken to heaven.
  • 23-25 – Most commentaries explain this as the boys having such disrespect, as did all their people, for the prophet Elisha or anything else representative of God. Elisha’s curse was also representative of the fate of the rest of the people in the city who rejected God. All in all, this is a strange and disturbing passage.

Acts 13:42-14:7:

  • 44-47 – The Jews, who were jealous of Paul and Barnabas’ crowd, denounced what Paul was saying. Paul reminds them that Jesus came for them first but was rejected. The gentiles now had a shot.
  • 1-7 – Though the readings have, at times, been misinterpreted as such, the Jews weren’t bad. Throughout Acts, many come to faith. Some of the Jewish religious leaders, however, did oppose Jesus’ mission and ministry and cause problems.

Psalm 139:1-24:

  • A beautiful psalm explaining the depth to which God knows us. He knew us in our mother’s womb. He knows our movements and our thoughts.
  • 23-24 – A powerful request for God to fully search your heart and take away the parts that don’t please him. A difficult prayer to pray, but the results would be life changing!

June 18 – Daily Notes – Amanda

This link is in the notes as well, but seriously, if you’d like Amy Grant to tell you today’s main Acts story, do yourself a favor and watch this video:

1 Kings 19:1-21:

  • 8 – Moses, Jesus, and now Elijah have all experienced 40 day fasts. Notice that each of them have just experienced or are simultaneously experiencing the power and glory of God. Jesus had just been baptized and received the Holy Spirit, Moses was on the mountain with God, and Elijah had just seen God consume a bull with fire.
  • 11-12 – Often we miss God’s voice and what he’s calling us to do because we’re distracted by the chaos and the big shows. At times, we must be quiet and still to hear him in the whisper.
  • 14-18 – Elijah felt very alone in his faithfulness to God and even feared for his life. God made it clear that he was not alone, but that God would take care of those who had been faithful while punishing those who had not.
  • 19 – Elijah putting his cloak on Elisha symbolizes a transfer of power.
  • 20-21 – Elijah’s response is unclear, but Elisha takes care of a few final things and then begins his life working with and learning from Elijah.

Acts 12:1-23:

  • 3 – Passover was also when Jesus was arrested and killed.
  • 6-11 – A thrilling, 80’s, musical rendition of this story: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNIO9KH3UC8.
  • 12-17 – They assumed that Peter would die in prison and were not expecting to see him.

Psalm 136:1-26:

  • We are to love God because of his great love for us. All the things he does for us, because of his love, are icing on the cake.

Proverbs 17:14-15:

  • 15 – Condoning evil and persecuting good are both equally detestable to God.

June 17 – Daily Notes – Amanda

elijah and prophets

Today’s 1 Kings reading includes a very cool story where we see God show up in power just when it seemed like the bad guys were going to win out. This story also shows us that God doesn’t have to conform to our ideas and constructs. In our understanding, wet wood doesn’t burn. In our understanding, dead people don’t come to life. God disagrees.

1 Kings 18:1-46:

  • 7-16 – Though Obadiah was a high-ranking official in Ahab’s kingdom, he followed the Lord. Obadiah, here, fears that Elijah will not present himself to Ahab and Obadiah will look like a liar and be killed.
  • 22-24 – Though we are not normally supposed to put God to the test, Elijah, a prophet of God, was clearly intended to do this.
  • 27 – Elijah taunts the prophets of Baal as they desperately try to get Baal to show up.
  • 39 – God’s power, which proves to be far greater than Baal’s, turns people’s hearts back to him.

Acts 11:1-30:

  • 2 – Yes, the “circumcision party” sounds like a terrible party, but this isn’t actually referring to a party with balloons and confetti. This is simply referring to a group of people who held to Jewish law and custom, but were believers in Christ.
  • 4-18 – It’s beautiful that these Jewish believers find great joy in God extending his grace and salvation to gentiles as well.
  • 26 – The term “Christian” means “little Christs”.

Psalm 135:1-21:

  • This is a psalm recounting a variety of reasons why God is praiseworthy and other gods are not. You could replace verse 8-12 with all the wonderful things God has done for you that give you reason to praise him.

Proverbs 17:12-13:

  • 12 – Well, I think that sums up how undesirable and destructive folly is.

June 16 – Daily Notes – Amanda

trump card

Peter was a faithful Jew. He followed Christ and taught others about him but still followed the laws he’d been given. In our reading in Acts yesterday and today, Peter’s world is turned upside down as God reveals to him that some of his laws were now secondary to assuring that people knew Christ.

1 Kings 15:25-17:24:

  • 25-26 – What’s worse than sinning yourself is also causing others to sin. Nadab sinned like his father and also drug the Israelites down with him.
  • The majority of today’s reading chronicles the parade of kings, their terrible choices, and their demises.
  • 29-33 – Ahab was the worst of the worst.
  • 1 – This is the same Elijah you’ve heard about. He is a powerful prophet.
  • 2-7 – This is Elijah, not Ahab, who is living by the brook and being fed by ravens.
  • 8-16 – As a widow, she would have had no source of income. It took a great act of faith to risk the little she had on a promise that she would be taken care of.

Acts 10:23b-48

  • 23-29 – Traditionally, a Jew wouldn’t enter the home of another people group. God made it clear to Peter that this was now ok and he no longer needed to keep these types of divisions.
  • 34-35 – Remember, Jesus explained that his first mission was to “the lost sheep of Israel” or Israelites who were not faithful. Peter continued that ministry, but now it is clear that ministry has been opened up to people other than the Israelites.
  • 44-48 – The Holy Spirit coming to the gentile believers was even more proof than Peter’s words that salvation was available for all.

Proverbs 17:9-11:

  • 10 – A wise person responds to rebukes while a foolish person can be told over and over and over.

March 13 – Daily Notes – Amanda

did you know

Did you know that the same person who wrote Luke also wrote Acts, the first book after the gospels? There are all kinds of fun tidbits to learn about Scripture that are great conversation starters at cocktail parties…well…maybe. Anyway, enjoy the beginning of Luke! It’s a great one!!

Numbers 19:1-20:29:

  • 1-19 – Here we see something sacrificed being used later to cleanse and restore an unclean tent.
  • 3 – The Israelites always seem to recall events that they once complained about as better than their current circumstances. It most commonly is tied to lack of provisions or fear of danger.
  • 6-13 – The older Israelite generation had already been forbidden from the Promised Land. Now, because he did not obey the Lord completely, Moses and Aaron are also forbidden. Moses was told to strike the rock once but he struck it twice. He also tried to take credit for what the Lord would do by providing water. He said, “Shall we bring water” when it was only the Lord’s work.
  • 28-29 – Even though the Israelites complained and rebelled a lot, clearly they loved Aaron.

Luke 1:1-25:

  • 1-4 – The writer of Luke is an intelligent, orderly person intent to write a logical, organized version of the story of Christ’s life. He also addresses his letter to Theophilus.
  • 9 – Only one priest entered the holy of holies at a time. An extensive cleansing ritual occurred before the priest entered.
  • 17 – John the Baptist was often considered the second coming of Elijah.

February 27 – Daily Notes – Amanda

church-lady

Verses 16-24 of our Leviticus reading today are pretty disturbing. We have to remember that many of the laws, like how to divorce, and this one about not letting people with physical deformities be priests, were to put parameters around things people were already doing. In the ancient Israelite culture, great importance was put on physical appearance (we can probably relate whether we like to or not) and God was trying to get people out of their own way.

Leviticus 20:22-22:16:

  • Being separate or set apart was important. God’s holiness sets him apart from humanity. God set the Israelites apart from other nations as his people. Some foods and other items were set apart to be holy enough or worthy enough for his people.
  • 1-9 – Priests had extra rules applied to them since they offered the sacrifices and had a special position.
  • 16-24 – Definitely a confusing passage in our current context. Like it said in 1 Samuel when David was chosen king, God doesn’t look at outward appearances but people do. This law was established so that people wouldn’t be distracted by their own judgment during worship.

Mark 9:1-29:

  • Moses and Elijah were two heroes of the Jewish faith. The disciples would have been awestruck by seeing these distinguished men.
  • 13 – John the Baptist was often compared to Elijah.
  • 24 – Often our problem is unbelief. We may believe in God’s power and ability in certain areas of life, but in others we think we need to handle it.
  • Note that in the story when the disciples don’t have enough faith to heal, Jesus does. Jesus often fills the gap when our ability ends.
  • 29 – This is true of many of our earthly problems.

Psalm 43:1-5:

  • 4 – Too often we ask for things of God and then fail to praise him for what he’s done.

January 16 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Genesis 32:13-34:31:

  • 24-32 – It is uncertain who exactly Jacob wrestled with. Some say it was actually God and others say it was an angel of God.
  • 28 – Jacob, though he currently has 11, eventually has 12 sons. These 12 sons each eventually become a tribe. This name change solidifies why we call them the 12 Tribes of Israel.
  • 1-4 – Jacob’s reticence to encounter Esau and Esau’s joy to see Jacob closely mirror the reactions of the Prodigal Son and his father in Luke.
  • 2 – Shechem raped Dinah. In ancient Israel any type of sex before marriage, whether your choice or not, was a great disgrace on women.
  • 21-22 – The Israelites were not supposed to inter-marry with Canaanites.
  • 25-29 – Jacob’s sons never had any intention of giving Dinah to Shechem as his wife. Instead, they planned to kill and plunder them as revenge.

 

Matthew 11:7-30:

  • 10 – Most Jews would have been familiar with prophecies. Jesus quotes a prophecy and begins to reveal both his and John the Baptist’s identities: the messenger and the Messiah.
  • 13-14 – John was often seen as the second coming of Elijah. Prophecy said that Elijah would come back again before the Messiah.
  • 20-24 – Tyre and Sidon and Sodom were all reviled cities by the Jews. They were cities full of gentiles and sinners. Jesus comments, though, that if they had had the same kinds of miraculous interactions with Jesus that the Jews had, they would have accepted it far faster.
  • 28-29 – Beautiful words inviting us into God’s care.