October 9 – Daily Notes – Amanda

fake muscles

Today’s psalm reading gives us a helpful insight into the culture of the ancient Israelites. It was widely believed among many cultures of that time that if bad things happened to you, you were not cared for by your god or that your god did not have the power to bless you. The psalmist asks for God to take away their punishment so other nations would stop taunting them and recognize the power of God. We now know (whether we like it or not) that our consequences for our sins do not reflect weakness in God.

Jeremiah 12:1-14:10:

  • 1-4 – Jeremiah, like many other faithful people, complains to God that, at times, unfaithful people prosper.
  • 5-13 – God’s response to Jeremiah is not ideal. He lets him know that things will get worse and that Jeremiah will be attacked by some of those closest to him.
  • 1-11 – God gives Jeremiah a very tangible sign of his plans for Judah who once clung to him but now has fallen into pride, which would ultimately lead to destruction.
  • 15-27 – God threatens to send Judah into exile unless they turn back to God. Particularly in verse 23, he does not seem hopeful for a good outcome.
  • 1-10 – This is talking about an actual drought on the land. People felt forsaken when they were not provided for through rain and plentiful crops.

1 Thessalonians 1:1-2:9:

  • 1-10 – Paul states how grateful he is for the good things he has heard about the faith of the Thessalonians. Though they received the gospel amidst persecution, Paul had already heard evidence of them spreading the gospel to others.
  • 1-9 – Paul confirms that his intentions in sharing the gospel with the Thessalonians were pure. He justifies this with examples.

Psalm 79:1-13:

  • This psalm confesses the sins of the people and asks for God’s forgiveness and that he would end the consequences. Other nations are taunting them as if their consequences mean that God is not caring for them.

Proverbs 24:30-34:

  • It is easy for us to become lazy and to fall into destruction. It usually starts small and builds without us noticing.

What to Expect – Week 11

donkey

Do you ever long for something you used to complain about? Like naps as little kids, now we would die for one in the middle of a long afternoon! In this week’s Numbers readings, the Israelites continue to long for what they begged to get out of. Their wanderings in the desert prove difficult and they think they’d rather be back in Egypt. You’ll also hear a talking donkey, learn the purpose of the Levites, and much more!

This week we also start a new gospel! Luke begins his gospel by explaining that he will provide an orderly, organized account of Jesus’ life and ministry. You’ll recognize his birth narrative from every Christmas Eve service you’ve ever been to. But you may never have noticed that there’s something different from the birth narrative in Matthew. Matthew focuses more on Joseph’s perspective while Luke focuses more on Mary’s.

Some other cool fun facts about Luke:

  • Luke also wrote Acts, which we’ll read after John.
  • Luke is known for its wide array of Jesus’ parables. Parables are found in Matthew, Mark, and Luke, but Luke has the most.
  • In Luke, women play a larger role than in any other gospel.
  • Luke contains both Mary’s Magnificat and Zechariah’s song – both beautiful praise pieces.

Enjoy this week! We’re making great progress! This is the 9th book we’ve started, so we’re doing great!!

March 11 – Daily Notes – Amanda

jewish boy

This obviously isn’t Jesus. I’m pretty sure Jesus didn’t wear sweaters and sit on folding chairs, but Jesus was a little Jewish boy who learned the same Scriptures of the Old Testament we learn today. He even memorized the Torah as all Jewish children are required to do. Often it’s hard to view Jesus as a human, but when he quotes Psalm 22 while on the cross in today’s reading from Mark, it reminds us that he learned Scripture and turned to it when in agony.

Numbers 15:17-16:40:

  • 22-26 – It might be weird for us to think about unintentionally sinning because we normally know when we’re making choices that probably aren’t pleasing to God. They truly might have worn something with mixed fabrics unintentionally or broken some other law that they made a mistake on. God made atonement for these sins fairly easy and universal.
  • 15 – Normally Moses is defending the Israelites to God and asking for mercy. This time, Moses seems to have had enough of their complaining and asks God not to respect their offerings.
  • 23-32 – Korah, Dathan, and Abiram got swallowed up by the earth as a sign that they truly didn’t follow the Lord.

Mark 15:1-47:

  • 15 – Key phrase – “wishing to satisfy the crowd.” We often do things to satisfy a crowd that hurts our relationship with Christ.
  • 19 – Striking his head with the reed was intended to force the thorns deeper into Jesus’ head.
  • 23 – At the last supper Jesus explained that he wouldn’t drink wine again until he drinks it with his disciples in his father’s kingdom.
  • 35 – Jesus quotes Psalm 22 here.
  • 38 – The temple curtain separated the holy of holies, where one could encounter God, from the areas where sinful people could be. Jesus’ death literally broke down that barrier.
  • 39 – Not insignificant that it is a gentile who recognizes Jesus’ identity.

Psalm 54:1-7:

  • David was in actual physical danger when he cried out to God with this Psalm.

March 8 – Daily Notes – Amanda

sorry

We all fall short and choose sin at times. David did too. In today’s psalm, David has been confronted with his sin by Nathan. David is truly and fully repentant and cries out to God for forgiveness. Star this psalm for the times when you need to repent and ask for forgiveness. We’ll all need it at some point.

Numbers 10:1-11:23:

  • 1-3 – You can imagine that God would grow tired and frustrated of hearing complaints from the people he was continually caring for and protecting.
  • The Israelites continue to think they have better ideas than the Lord. They continue to doubt his provision for them.

Mark 14:1-21:

  • 3-9 – This story is also found in Matthew. One significant addition to Mark’s version is in Jesus’ response to the naysayers. He says, “whenever you want, you can do good for them.” It seems to suggest that they denounce this woman for not tending to the poor and yet they don’t either.

Psalm 51:1-19:

  • Note that this is a Psalm written by David in response to Nathan rebuking him when he committed adultery with Bathsheba and then sent her husband to the front lines of battle to cover up his sins.
  • This is a Psalm to read and pray when you are ready to fully repent of a sin you’ve committed.
  • Note that David recognizes that God is not looking for a sacrifice or offering, but true brokenness and repentance from the sinner.

February 2 – Daily Notes – Amanda

focus

Today’s psalm is simply beautiful. Read verse 4 a couple of times. It’s worth it. Can you imagine if you had one and only one focus – and that focus was to be in the presence of God? How different would your life look?

Exodus 15:19-17:7:

  • 24 – Just 3 days after God parted the Red Sea to protect the Israelites, they complain because of a lack of drinkable water
  • 26 – God often offers us rules and limits to protect us. It is our job to decide if we will accept and follow or not.
  • 3-21 – God provides food through quails and manna. He asks them to only take enough for a day. Many still don’t trust and take more to assure they’ll have some for the next day.
  • 29 – God offers people a Sabbath. The 10 Commandments, which have 1 commandment about the Sabbath have not been written yet.
  • 32 – Remembering things from generation to generation was frequent.
  • Be sure to read the footnotes. They can be helpful.

Matthew 22:1-33:

  • 1-14 – a parable explaining the peoples’ contempt for and rejection of Jesus’ message. The person at the end without the wedding garment represents the judgment of those who did not accept Jesus as the Messiah.
  • 17-22 – Caesar’s image was on the coin. It belongs to Caesar. God’s image is on all of us. We belong to God.
  • 29-33 – The Sadducees try to stump Jesus but he explains that there question is irrelevant because terms need to be redefined in light of the resurrection.

Psalm 27:1-6:

  • 1 – One of the most comforting verses in all of Scripture.
  • 4 – 1 thing – singular focus is seeking God

Proverbs 6:20-26:

  • 21-22 referring back to Deuteronomy 6
  • This proverb offers encouragement to put in the time before you’re tested to know, trust, and believe God’s commandments will pay off