December 6 – Daily Notes – Amanda

5 love languages

There was a book written a while back called “The Five Love Languages”. It narrows showing and receiving love down into five categories and says that we all fall into some combination of them. Our 2 John reading today might disagree slightly because it states that the church can show God love through obedience to his commandments. When we love God, we follow his commands.

Hosea 4:1-5:15:

  • 1-19 – Hosea, the prophet, presents God’s “case” against Israel. This is explaining the different ways they have broken their covenant with God. One major accusation is against the priests.
  • 1-15 – This section explains God’s coming punishment on Israel and Judah. In the final verse God promises to still be available when they return to him.

2 John 1-13:

  • 1- The “elect lady” is most likely referring to the church.
  • 5-6 – The author reminds the church that they have received God’s commandments and can show their love for God by following those commands.

Psalm 125:1-5:

  • 4-5 – The psalmist, here, seems to assume that the Israelites will fall in the category of the upright because he is quick to ask for punishment on the wicked and blessing on the righteous.

Proverbs 29:9-11:

  • 11- Over and over in the proverbs restraint is valued. Wisdom is knowing when to act or speak and when to refrain.

August 4 – Daily Notes – Amanda

pray for you

Have you ever wanted to pray for someone but not known how? It’s easy for that to happen. Often we know someone is struggling but don’t know how. Other times people just pop into our brains and we feel the urge to pray for them. If this happens to you, pray 1 Corinthians 1:4-8 over them. It’s a pretty great prayer for anyone.

2 Chronicles 35:1-36:23:

  • 1-19 – There had been significant periods of time, while under bad kings, that the Israelites did not observe Passover. This may seem like tedious information, but it’s showing that the Israelites were doing their best to be faithful here.
  • 20-22 – Josiah was faithful for most of his life, but in the end, he tried to oppose the will of God and died trying.
  • 9 – Jehoiachin is different than Jehoiakim. It’s easy to read quickly and miss that subtle transition.
  • 15 – These “messengers” were the prophets. In the gospels, particularly in parables, there are often people who are trying to bring messages who are ignored or rejected. These characters represent the prophets as well.
  • 22-23 – King Cyrus, a king who is not an Israelite, is called to return the exiles to their land and rebuild the temple.

1 Corinthians 1:1-17:

  • This is Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians. Note that letters to different churches tend to have different emphases. He is trying to teach the churches how to live and grow faithfully. Every church has its own hangups in that regard.
  • 4-8 – This is a beautiful way to pray for someone you love and want to encourage.
  • 10-17 – Paul encourages the Corinthians to stop focusing on divisive issues and to recognize that they are all called to and saved by Christ.

Psalm 27:1-6:

  • 1 – Remember this when you have fear of any kind.
  • 2-6 – David speaks with words of great confidence that God will protect him in any and every situation.

Proverbs 20:20-21:

  • God clearly meant the “honor your father and mother” law.

What to Expect – Week 23

mufasa scar

This week we start a new book: 1 Kings. In this book, we’ll learn a lot of “what not to do’s”. Unfortunately, Solomon starts a line of numerous bad kings. But don’t lose hope! There are a few good guys sprinkled in here and there. Throughout 1 & 2 Kings, be sure to note the attributes that make a good king and those that make a bad one.

We also just started another new book: Acts. Acts directly follows the gospels and is the story of what Jesus’ disciples did just after his death, resurrection, and ascension.

In today’s reading, we find out what the earliest church looked like. When you look at the way they served and interacted with the church, how similarly does it look to your church participation? How could you better emulate the way they lived out their faith?

It’s also amazing how active and effective their faith was. People are coming to faith left and right. Healings are happening where previously the disciples’ faith wasn’t strong enough. Overall, it’s a faith extravaganza!

Use this week to be inspired and moved by the faith and action of the disciples. What’s one thing you could do this week to connect your faith to that of a first century believer?

January 25 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Genesis 50:1-Exodus 2:10:

  • 15-21 – Our sinfulness has long-lasting consequences. We often face them long after the actual situation is over. Joseph’s brothers still have guilt and shame on them and assume their brother will now pay back evil for evil. Instead, Joseph recognizes his place in the situation and recognizes that God redeemed to good what his brother meant for evil.
  • 26 – Unlike his father, Joseph had made Egypt his home and was fine with being buried there.
  • 7-14 – With a new king and the death of Joseph, the Egyptians quickly forget the good Joseph did for them. As the Israelites grow in size and strength while they live in Egypt, the Egyptians grow fearful of them and eventually enslave them to keep them under control.
  • 15-16 – Pharaoh is trying to control the Israelite population and their ability to join enemies in war.
  • 17-21 – Sometimes faithfulness seems impossible. The midwives chose faithfulness even though it was in direct disobedience to the king.
  • 1-10 – Moses’ mother finds a way to give him a chance at life. Moses’ sister’s quick thinking allows his mother to nurse and care for him.

Matthew 16:13-17:9:

  • 13-20 – Peter is the first of the disciples to identify Jesus as the Messiah. Jesus blesses him because this was clearly revealed to Peter by the Father. Peter becomes the rock of the church and is given great authority going forward.
  • 21-23 – This is a quick transition between Peter being told he would lead the church to being called Satan. In this section, Peter puts his own plans for Jesus ahead of God’s.
  • 24-25 – Note that no one knew Jesus would take up an actual cross at his death. He is calling them to be willing to make the same kind of sacrifice he will soon make.
  • 28 – Though somewhat confusing, this is not intended to mean that some of the people standing there would still be alive when Jesus returned a second time. Though there are many interpretations, one feasible one is that Jesus is saying that some people would live to see Christ reign in the world. Many were alive as Pentecost and then the spread of the church began. Some even led it.
  • 5 – This is the same phrase recorded from Jesus’ baptism.

Psalm 21:1-13:

  • Note that many psalms filled with violence and seeking revenge still end with praise and exultation of God. Clearly praise was a fallback whether times were good or bad.

Proverbs 5:1-6:

  • This section gives a great description of just how seductive temptation can be. We would much more easily avoid temptation if it wasn’t attractive and sneaky. Before we know it, we have followed temptation into destruction.