November 11 – Daily Notes – Amanda

soap opera

If the Bible was a soap opera, it would win all the daytime Emmys. Even in today’s psalm, David talks to God about someone he was once very close to but now has been betrayed by. David is the same man who killed a giant, was hunted down by his predecessor, had an affair and had his mistresses husband killed, which eventually led to his firstborn dying. The list goes on and on.

Ezekiel 23:1-49:

  • 1-21 – This message from God compares Jerusalem and Syria to two promiscuous sisters. These two people groups were first God’s, but then they offered themselves to many others and ultimately God turned away from them because of their unfaithfulness.
  • 22-35 – Jerusalem’s consequences for unfaithfulness are spelled out.

Hebrews 10:18-39:

  • 19-25 – This passage explains how Christ broke down any barriers that separated people from God, giving them access to God directly. The author encourages believers to hold true to their hope in Christ and to spur others onto faithfulness and connection with God too.
  • 26-31 – Here, the author confirms the need for believers to have a transformed lives. Those who know the truth and continue sinning will be punished.

Psalm 109:1-31:

  • 1-20 – David is clearly angry at someone who he once felt close to but has since betrayed him. This psalm, because of the anger and hatred toward someone, is often avoided in church services and reading plans.
  • 21-29 – David asks for God to care for him even though this enemy has persecuted him.

September 11 – Daily Notes – Amanda

friendship bracelets

Have you ever been betrayed by a friend? Or worse, have you ever betrayed a friend? In today’s psalm, David feels the pain of betrayal at the hands of a friend. Though this is always the risk, we know that God designed us to be in relationship and that, though betrayal is excruciating, the benefits of relationship are worth the risk.

Isaiah 8:1-9:21:

  • 11-15 – The Lord becomes a safe place to those who follow him but becomes a stumbling block for those who oppose him.
  • 1-7 – A prophecy describing the Messiah that is to come. Enjoy this musical interpretation of this powerful prophecy.
  • 8-21 – This foretells the coming demise of the Northern Kingdom of Israel. Though God’s hand is still available, the people continue to walk towards evil and destruction.

2 Corinthians 12:1-10:

  • 7-9 – Most theologians believe that Paul did have some sort of infirmity that he wanted to get rid of but could not. This kept him humble and may have also been a hindrance from moving quickly and traveling easily.
  • 10 – It is often our difficulties that cause us to better relate to others with difficult conditions. They also allow us to be more thankful. Paul also realized that these are often the places where we are actually strongest.

Psalm 55:1-23:

  • 12-15 – David was betrayed by a friend, which, as we all know, hurts much more than when we’re hurt by an enemy or stranger.
  • 16-19 – David has great trust in the Lord to take care of him despite the ill intentions of his enemies.

Proverbs 23:4-5:

  • Though wealth seems to bring earthly status, it is fleeting and not worth spinning our wheels over.

September 10 – Daily Notes – Amanda

excuses

Isaiah becomes one of the most bold, confident mouthpieces for God in his years as a prophet, but in his calling, which we’ll read today, he’s timid. He, like so many others in Scripture, feels unworthy of what God is calling him to do. When God calls us, he also gives us the ability to fulfill that calling.

Isaiah 6:1-7:25:

  • 1-4 – This sets the scene for Isaiah’s calling to be God’s prophet. God is described as vast and powerful.
  • 5 – It is very common for folks in the Bible to be hesitant to accept their callings. They often have excuses.
  • 6-7 – God always has a solution for people’s excuses.
  • 8 – Yet another example of a person in Scripture who answers, “Here I am”.
  • 9-13 – God is fed up with the Israelites unfaithfulness. He sends Isaiah to speak a message of repentance but knows the people won’t listen.
  • 1-9 – Syria and Israel are in cahoots to attack Jerusalem, which is part of Judah. Isaiah is to assure Judah that Syria and Israel will not prevail.
  • 14 – This is a clear prophecy of Jesus’ birth, which wouldn’t happen for over 400 years, but is also specifically talking about Isaiah’s son, Immanuel.

2 Corinthians 11:16-33:

  • 19-21 – Apparently the Corinthians were very patient with those who wronged them. Paul admits he did not have that kind of strength.
  • 22-29 – These are Paul’s credentials. This is what he’s been willing to endure for the sake of Christ.

Psalm 54:1-7:

  • David writes this Psalm after being ratted out. He has been betrayed but his hope is still in the Lord because he knows God has taken care of him before and will continue to do so.

May 30 – Daily Notes – Amanda

pontius-pilate

Was Pilate a good guy? Bad buy? Or helpless pawn? I’ve always believed he was this big, powerful, hateful guy happy to kill Jesus. After today’s reading though, honestly, it’s hard to say. In John’s gospel, he is depicted as fairly tormented and definitely asserts his position on Jesus’ crucifixion with what he writes on the sign above Jesus’ head. What do you think?

2 Samuel 15:23-16:23:

  • 31- Ahithophel had been an advisor for David, but here deserts him for Absalom. It is likely Psalm 41:9 and 55:12-14 are written about Ahithophel.
  • 32-37 – David sends Hushai to work with Absalom to counter act Ahithophel’s counsel. Hushai remains faithful to David.
  • 1-4 – Mephibosheth is Jonathan’s son who David showed kindness to after Saul and Jonathan died. Mephibosheth’s servant, Ziba, says Mephibosheth is also siding against David. David grants Ziba a great deal of wealth.
  • 5-14 – Any king would have been well within his rights to kill Shimei for cursing him. David, thinking that God could have sent this person, allows the persecution.
  • 23 – An interesting verse – it does not say that Ahithophel does consult God, it says that he is like one who consulted with God.

John 18:25-19:22:

  • 27 – The first denial was in yesterday’s reading.
  • 29-32 – Pilate, a Roman official, had no interest in the Jews’ accusations. Pilate was a low-ranking official. Though his existence has been historically confirmed, if not for this incident with Jesus, there would have been little record of him.
  • 36 – Jesus’ power comes from God, not from normal earthly forces like money, military prowess, or strength. This is why he didn’t have an army of followers fighting to set him free.
  • 11 – In order to fulfill his purpose, God gave Pilate authority over Jesus’ future. Pilate is clearly tormented over this decision he’s been given.
  • 19 – It seems that Pilate may have had some sort of belief in Christ. The Jews did not want the inscription he wrote because it seemed definitive when they were trying to argue that he was a liar.

Psalm 119:113-128:

  • 127 – A lofty thought for us in consumer-driven America.

Proverbs 16:10-11:

  • 11 – Many tax collectors and others who worked with money would cheat on the weights so people had to pay far more than what was actually owed.