August 11th

1 Chronicles 18-21

  • 19:16-19 – The Syrians and Ammonites were both known as strong armies. The Syrians did not like having been defeated by Israel, but David defeats them again when they come back for more.
  • 20:1 – Presumably, this is the same time when David sleeps with Bathsheba. That story begins in the same way explaining that spring time was when nations fought and David did not go with them as he should have.
  • 21:1 – Though there were times God asked the Israelites to number themselves, he had not asked David to do so. David is most likely doing this out of a lack of trust and wanting to be able to gauge who he could defeat in war and who he could not.
  • 21:11-17 – David has a choice of consequences and his choice caused his people to suffer. Once it became reality, he tried to make it stop.
  • 21:22-27 – If Ornan had given his property for David’s sacrifice, David would actually be sacrificing nothing. This is why he won’t accept Ornan’s gift.

August 10th

  • 15:1-24 – David prepares a huge celebration for the arrival of the Ark of the Covenant to Jerusalem.
  • 15:29 – This is the same story that’s found in 2 Samuel 6 when David dances undignified before the Lord as the Ark of the Covenant returns to its rightful place and people.
  • 16:8-36 – Like Moses, Mary, Zechariah, and others, David has a song for the Lord to praise him for a specific situation but also uses that time to praise God for his overall goodness.
  • 17:1-15 – Like we learned in 2 Samuel, God did not intend for David to build the temple. That would be Solomon, his son’s, job. God made promises to David, however, about building him up and establishing his kingdom long term.
  • 17:16-27 – David humbly accepts the blessings God offers he and his family.

August 9th

1 Chronicles 11-14

  • 11:4-9 – Jerusalem became the central city for the Israelites and remains so to this day, but it was not so until this conquest of David.
  • 11:15-19 – Though David’s actions seem a bit ungrateful, he pours the water out as a drink offering because he considers himself not worthy of their extreme devotion. The reason David wanted the water in the first place is because he was originally from Bethlehem.
  • 12:19-40 – At the time the chronicler is talking about, David was still not king. He had a great deal of men who chose to defect from Saul to him.

August 8th

1 Chronicles 1-10

  • The Ancient Israelites kept incredible records and this is one of many examples of them. They start at Adam and make their way all the way to David including rulers of other nations to ensure their relevance in the overall world.
  • 2:18-20 – Though this just feels like a big list of names, it’s interesting to see names you recognize from stories. Bezalel, for instance, was one of the skilled workers who helped create the tabernacle.
  • 3:1-9 – Yes, David had a lot of sons and a lot of wives. Notice that Solomon, who became the next king after David is way down on the list of sons.
  • 4:9-10 – This story seems out of place in a long list of genealogy, but it was common to place some small, historical story in these lists. It may have been to add legitimacy and context to the list.
  • 4:39-43 – This is one of the many examples of the hostility between the Israelites and Amalekites.
  • 5:1 – Reuben slept with his father Jacob’s concubine.
  • 5:18-26 – These are two examples of immediate action in opposite directions based on the tribe’s faithfulness or lack there of. When the 3 tribes were seeking God, they were rewarded with victory. When they were unfaithful, they were punished with exile.
  • Chapter 6 is a series of lists of the Levitical priests. The tribe of Levi is set apart as sacramental priests and we often hear of them in conjunction with particular kings.
  • 6:31-32 – You can imagine that these men sang some of David’s psalms.
  • 6:54-81 – Remember that when Moses was handing out inheritances of land parcels to each tribe, the Levites did not get one because they received the tithes of the people. Instead, each tribe was to give the Levites portions of their land to live on. This is the explanation of what land the Levites got.
  • 9:2 – After a long time in exile in Babylon, the Israelites were allowed to slowly return to their land.
  • 9:17-27 – The position of gatekeeper was one of honor. It was passed down through generations. This position guarded the gates of the temple and the chief gatekeeper manned the gate the king would enter through.
  • 9:39 – This is Saul, the first king of Israel. We know he was from the tribe of Benjamin so that’s the tribe we’re talking about now.
  • 10:1-7 – This is the event that finally allows David to become king. We read about this previously in 1 Samuel.

July 7th

Malachi 3-4

  • 3:1-7 – Part of this prophecy sounds like it’s talking about the Messiah and part sounds like it’s John the Baptist. Either way, it is later fulfilled.
  • 4:1-3 – A day of judgment is prophecied.
  • 4:5-6 – John the Baptist was often associated with Elijah.

July 6th

Malachi 1-2

  • 1:1-5 – The words love and hate could be exchanged for “chose” and “did not choose”. God chose Jacob to set up his people. He did not choose Esau. Not only did Esau forego his blessing and birthright, but his descendants often fought against the Israelites. They brought God’s curse upon themselves.
  • 1:6-14 – The Lord denounces the blemished offerings the priests put before him. These half-hearted offerings showed their lack of devotion to God.
  • 2:1-9 – The priests had been given special authority. God asked that they honor him and lead the rest of the people in spiritual practices. Here he rebukes them for failing to do so.
  • 2:10-16 – Scholars disagree on whether this is actually talking about marriage and marrying foreign women or metaphorically speaking of idolatry. Either way, the Judeans were practicing things God did not approve of.

August 5th

Zechariah 9-14

  • 9:1-8 – The prophecy announces judgment to come down on a variety of Israel’s enemies.
  • 9:9-13 – This prophecy is fulfilled by Jesus when he rides into Jerusalem on a donkey on Palm Sunday.
  • 10:1-12 – These verses establish that Judah and Israel will be restored to greatness. The last few verses show the turning of the tides between those who are currently powerful and the Israelites.
  • 11:7-16 – This is a difficult passage to understand. It is a vision that depicts a shepherd breaking covenants. Verse 16 speaks of a future shepherd who doesn’t seem to be describing Jesus.
  • 11:17 – This verse makes it clear that the shepherd in the vision is not Jesus.
  • 12:1-5 – This oracle explains that Judah and Jerusalem will both be a challenge for anyone who possesses them and tries
  • 12:10 – Most people would consider this a prophecy fulfilled by Jesus.
  • 13:1-6 – This alludes to Christ’s death when people are freely forgiven of their sins.
  • 14:1-21 – This chapter describes the day of the Lord and what God’s enemies should expect on that day. It does not sound good for his enemies.

August 4th

Zechariah 5-8

  • 6:1-8 – The horses and chariots seem to represent God’s power returning to Judah and Israel.
  • 7:9-14 – Zerubbabel and Joshua were to work together to rebuild the temple.
  • 7:8-10 – God tells the Israelites, through Zechariah, exactly how he wants them to live. He is looking for kindness, mercy, and help for the poor.
  • 7:11-14 – The Israelites didn’t listen but hardened their hearts
  • 8:1-8 – God promises to restore Jerusalem and paints a desirably picture of the state to which it will return.
  • 8:14-17 – God reminds the Israelites of why he brought destruction on their ancestors and explains how he would like for them to live so he can fully prosper them.

August 3rd

Zechariah 1-4

  • 1:1-6 – Zechariah’s prophecy immediately follows Haggai’s and is addressed to post-exilic Israelites. He begins with a call to return to the Lord.
  • 1:7-17 – This begins a vision of an angel who seems to offer God’s grace and restoration to Israel.
  • 2:6-12 – God declares to those who were taken into exile and have been in Babylon, that he will restore Jerusalem and that even others will turn to God because of God’s restoration of Israel.
  • 3:1-10 – Part of restoring Jerusalem and the temple was restoring the priests. Joshua’s clean garments are symbolic of his return to God.
  • 4:1-7 – Clearly it was not going to be through merely physical effort that God’s purposes would be accomplished. It was by God’s spirit working through Zerubbabel’s words that ultimately did so.
  • 4:8-10 – Zerubbabel was charged with rebuilding the temple. God blessed its completion.

August 2nd

Haggai

  • 1:1-6 – Haggai is given the message to rebuild the temple. He was a contemporary of Zerubbabel, who we read about in Ezra. Haggai supported Zerubbabel as he led the effort to rebuild the temple.
  • 2:1-9 – Haggai is called to spur on Zerubbabel and Joshua to rebuild the temple even though they weren’t familiar with the glory of the first one.
  • 2:12-19 – Though confusing to interpret, this passage seems to make it clear that though impurity is easily spread, purity is not. God is displeased that the Israelites have returned and built their own houses and begun to farm but have not focused on his house. He reminds them that he controls what they have no matter how much effort they put in.
  • 2:23 – Zerubbabel is in the line of David. The signet ring would be a sign that God had placed his favor on him and would be the sign that David’s line had, as God said it would, returned to the throne.