October 3 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Scott Peterson

When we cheer for or celebrate the tragedies of others, God is not pleased. Today’s proverb reminds us of that. We may disagree with the person or their actions or principles, but we are not to find joy in their misfortune. Try to remember this nugget of wisdom next time you think someone “gets what they deserve”.

Jeremiah 1:1-2:30:

  • 4-10 – Like several others called by God, Jeremiah has an excuse of why he can’t possibly be God’s instrument. God disagrees and assures him that he will.
  • 13-14 – Babylon is to the north and eventually fulfills this prophecy.
  • 18 – Jeremiah will be protected by God as long as he is serving God.
  • 1-30 – Through Jeremiah, God remembers the connection he had with Israel and then how sharply they turned from him. They cannot deny how much they’ve forsaken him because he gives specific examples.

Philippians 4:1-23:

  • 2 – Just so you don’t feel dumb, here are phonetic spellings of the two names here: You-o-de-uh and Sin-te-kay.
  • 4-7 – When we release things to God in prayer, we are free not to worry anymore. God’s peace can comfort us and give us confidence that the situation will be resolved.
  • 8 – This verse reminds us where our minds should be. We allow so much filth into our thought life, it is hard to be focused on the good, true, and pure.
  • 10-13 – Paul doesn’t speak simply in “what if’s”, he had learned to trust God with a little or a lot.

Psalm 75:1-10:

  • This psalm delineates the differences in the treatment of the righteous and the wicked.

Proverbs 24:17-20:

  • 17-18 – Everyone is God’s child. We should not gain joy from another’s misfortunes.

October 2 – Daily Notes – Amanda

whats-the-big-deal-2

Today, as we finish Isaiah, and read today’s psalm, we realize just how big of a deal exile was to the Israelites. To us, it’s an event in history. To them, it was the end of everything they’d known and they didn’t know if what they’d known would ever return. In order to understand the story of God’s people, it is imperative that we understand the weight and impact of the exile.

Isaiah 66:1-24:

  • 10-14 – People should rejoice with Jerusalem because God is restoring the city.
  • 18-24 – God explains specifically what will happen to the Israelites who make it through the judgments. They will be considered the remnant. They will see others who were rejected due to their sin not to gloat but to understand God’s judgment even better.

Philippians 3:4b-21:

  • 4-11 – Paul explains that he would have every reason to be confident if self-righteousness were an option. He has all the boxes checked. He realizes that salvation through faith in the resurrection is the only righteousness he needs.
  • 13-14 – Ultimately Paul was pressing on for an eternal prize.
  • 17-18 – It should be each of our goals to be able to walk in a manner that allows us to ask others to follow us. So many would seek to be spiritual leaders but fall off the track easily.

Psalm 74:1-23:

  • 1-8 – The psalmist mourns over the Israelites’ exile. God has turned away from the Israelites, the temple has been destroyed, and he wonders how long this will continue.
  • 9-23 – The psalmist is reminded of the great things God has done, proving his ability, and asks God to restore the Israelites.

Proverbs 24:15-16:

  • This warns against sliding into a pattern similar to those who seek to harm righteous people. Those unhealthy patterns ultimately lead to destruction.

October 1 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Isaiah's calling

As we wrap up Isaiah, it is incredible to think back on the month or so it has taken us to get through this powerful book. Isaiah rejects and then accepts his call, preaches destruction and exile for the Israelites, preaches eventual restoration for the Israelites, and sprinkles little hints of what to look for in a Messiah throughout. And while it is, at times, a difficult book to trudge through, A) you did it! and B) it offers both immediate and eternal hope.

Isaiah 62:6-65:25:

  • 6-12 – God continues to paint the picture of Jerusalem’s coming salvation. He speaks of preparations for that day and makes promises that the Israelites will no longer be defeated.
  • 1-6 – God speaks of how he took vengeance on his enemies.
  • 7-19 – The speaker changes to someone who is remembering how merciful God has been and then asking for more of that mercy.
  • 1-12 – They continue to ask to see God’s power in saving them and bringing them out of trouble.
  • 1-16 – God juxtaposes the treatment of his servants with that of those who choose not to serve him. God’s servants will receive great blessing while the others will receive great pain.

Philippians 2:19-3:4a:

  • 19-24 – Timothy was a young man Paul had taken under his wing. Paul commissioned him to spread the gospel as well.
  • 2-4 – Once again Paul explains that living by the Spirit is far more necessary than circumcision. He reminds his readers that he, as a Jew, is circumcised so he can say this out of truth and not jealousy.

Psalm 73:1-28

  • The entire psalm, but with a crescendo in verses 25-26, are attesting to the confidence the psalmist has in God as his hope, salvation, and protection.

Proverbs 24:13-14:

  • This portion makes a very tangible comparison of how wisdom benefits us.

September 30 – Daily Notes – Amanda

prove it

Prove it! This is yelled across many a junior high lunch table as one testosterone-rich adolescent boy claims he can do something that he most likely cannot. This is also basically what Paul says to the Philippians. Prove your salvation in front of others by living righteously and faithfully. This should be true of our lives too. If we are saved, it show in our words, actions, and decisions.

Isaiah 60:1-62:5:

  • 1-22 – God explains in great detail all the ways Israel will be restored to glory. When they went into exile God and the Israelites became a laughing stock. That would soon change.
  • 1-2 – Jesus quotes this passage exactly in Luke 4:18-19 in his first public sermon.
  • 1-11 – God declares his year of favor. Debts are forgiven. Those who suffer and mourn will be comforted…and a lot of other great stuff.
  • 1-5 – God continues to proclaim wonderful restorative acts for Israel.

Philippians 1:27-2:18:

  • 27-30 – Paul calls the Philippians to live with integrity in their faithfulness so that others who are watching would be convinced of their salvation.
  • 1-11 – Paul calls the Philippians to humble themselves and serve in a similar fashion as Jesus did.

Psalm 72:1-20:

  • Note that this psalm is written by David’s son, Solomon, the third king of Israel.
  • Solomon asks for blessings for the king. This is presumably when he is starting out as king because it says that David’s prayers have now ended.

Proverbs 24:11-12:

  • We cannot claim ignorance and pretend not to know that people are moving towards death and destruction. If we ignore them, it says God will do the same to us.

September 29 – Daily Notes – Amanda

starting line

Today we start Philippians. Like Ephesians and Galatians, this is a letter Paul wrote to a church he had interest in. If you ever talk to someone who wants to grow deeper in their faith and isn’t sure where to start in the Bible, Philippians is a great place to send them. It is short, simple, and to the point.

Isaiah 57:14-59:21:

  • 1-14 – The Lord makes it clear what kinds of worship he prefers. True worship is never routine and meaningless. He asks for us to care for those in need as an act of worship.
  • 1-19 – God will not tolerate injustice and he is clear that he will punish those who oppress others.
  • 17 – Note the similarity to the Armor of God from Ephesians.
  • 21 – God makes a new covenant with the new Israel. Though this is not the covenant of Christ yet, it is a new way for God to connect with his people.

Philippians 1:1-26:

  • 1-6 – Paul begins most of his letters with a warm greeting and encouragement on how thankful he is that the recipients of the letter are partnering with him in living out and spreading the gospel of Christ.
  • 12-14 – Though other believers may have been concerned about facing similar persecution as Paul, he assures them that it has been worth it because of how it has advanced the gospel.
  • 21 – Paul offers several poetic yet slightly cryptic sayings like this throughout his letters. Paul basically means that if he’s alive, he’s going to be serving Christ. When he dies, he’ll get to be with Christ.

Psalm 71:1-24:

  • 1-16 – The psalmist is confident in the Lord’s ability to save him from his enemies because he is able to reflect on other times God has taken care of him.
  • 17-24 – The psalmist praises God in advance for taking care of him and even promises to tell others of God’s great deeds.

Proverbs 24:9-10:

  • 10 – This verse calls out all those who feel strong in their faith or otherwise who then topple over when difficulties come. The strength of our faith is determined when tested.