January 13 – Daily Notes – Amanda

Genesis 28:1-29:35:

  • 1-9 – Jacob is sent to find an Israelite to marry. Esau already had two Canaanite wives, which Jacob is strictly forbidden from. Esau then marries a woman descended from Ishmael.
  • 10-13 – In the book of John, Jesus likens himself to this ladder Jacob dreams of when he explains that angels will ascend and descend on the Son of Man.
  • 14-20 – Presumably Jacob is working for Laban in the month when he first stays with him. Laban offers to pay him for his work eventually and Jacob asks for his younger daughter in return.
  • 25 – Unfortunate for Leah that someone has to be duped into marrying her.
  • 31-35 – Though Rachel has Jacob’s heart, Leah has his sons, which societally was much more significant.

Matthew 9:18-38:

  • 18-26 – Jesus performs two miracles, one unintentionally. The bleeding woman’s faith heals her, but Jesus clearly overcomes the lack of faith of all those morning the young girl’s death by raising her from the dead.
  • 27-31 – Once again, Jesus encounters people who believe in his ability. Once they are healed, they disobey Jesus’ instructions not to tell anyone what has happened.
  • 18-34 – A series of 3 miracles right in a row indicates that it is important that the reader notice this. Whenever anything comes in 3’s, the reader should pay close attention.
  • 36 – This phrase, “sheep without a shepherd” is used to describe the Israelites in the Old Testament and the Jews in the New Testament multiple times.
  • 37-38 – This is still true today. There are a wealth of people who need to hear the gospel and repent, but few who are willing to share the message.

Psalm 11:1-7:

  • David chooses to take refuge in the Lord instead of following the advice of others to flee from his enemies because they are clearly ready to attack.
  • 4-7 – David contrasts the righteousness of God with the sinfulness of the wicked.

Proverbs 3:11-12:

  • We should not receive God or trusted advisors’ reproaches as hateful or negative. Instead, we should view it as enough love to care to correct us and help us get better.

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